Face Products Not Safe During Pregnancy

Skin Care ingredients to avoid during Pregnancy

It's important to shelf the beta hydroxy acid (BHA) while pregnant or breastfeeding. Found in many topical exfoliants, cleansers and toners, this popular acid is mainly used to treat problem skin with acne. The biggest concern is when the skin is exposed to the acid in a peel. The saturation means more product is used, meaning more is absorbed into the skin and into the bloodstream. Essential oils are sometimes considered one of the most effective “natural” defenses against acne, amongst other treatable skin conditions. Topical use of specific essential oils work very well against the bacteria that cause pimples to form and decongesting the pores -  getting rid of congestion that causes acne. Improper use can lead to nausea, headaches, even burning the skin. To execute safe, effective treatments during pregnancy it is important understand the proper dilutions of essential oils. Tea tree, lavender and lemongrass essential oils are all antibacterial solutions to help rid the skin of acne and/or inflammation, however caution must be taken. Lavendar is one of the safest essential oils to use, as it’s calming and rids the skin of irritations; it speeds up healing and is regularly used to treat wounds, burns and acne lesions. Lactic Acid, Glycolic Acid and other alpha-hydroxy acids (AHA's) are safe to use during pregnancy, and will help keep the skin smooth and hydrated, refining your pores. Benzoyl peroxide is a topical solution compound that has been given the green light by physicians and OBs for many years to treat acne during pregnancy. Benzoyl Peroxide of a small percentage (2.5% - 5%) is absorbed into the skin. more...



Pregnancy Safe Skin Care : What to Use and What to Avoid

These color changes are triggered by hormones that increase the production of melanin in the skin. All of these tips are not only safe, but highly encouraged throughout your pregnancy to make sure that you and your little one are getting all the primp and pamper you deserve! You may get that pregnancy glow or you may develop more oily and acne-prone skin. Our Citrus Mint Facial Cleanser is an excellent first step to removing oils and impurities on the skin. For a moisturizer, we recommend topping this skin care routine off with our Herbal Facial Oil for Oily and Acne Prone Skin . They are not recommended for use undiluted directly on the skin, however. Are Annmarie Skin Care Products Safe During Pregnancy? Common questions we’ve received from our customers are either regarding the white willow bark in our Herbal Facial Oil for Oily/Acne Prone Skin or the use of essential oils throughout. Are you more cautious with your skin care products now that you’re pregnant? Your Perfectly Pampered Pregnancy: Beauty, Health, and Lifestyle Advice for the Modern Mother-to-Be. more...



Pregnancy Acne - What to Expect

Get your free personalized pregnancy and baby newsletter. We will use your information to send you our newsletters, coupons and special offers, and we share your information with our partners. Here's why your pregnancy complexion looks worse than it did in middle school, along with what you can do about it. Acne — those rashy, pimply bumps that tend to flare up just when you have a big meeting or wedding on your calendar — can appear on your face (of course), hairline, neck, breasts, and, yes, your butt. And your body is also retaining more fluids , which contain toxins that can lead to zits. Your best offense is a good defense: Prevent flare-ups and scars by taking good care of your skin during pregnancy . And keep your pillowcases, towels and any hats you wear regularly clean as well. As your mother always warned you (and this time she’s right), these tactics will only make zits last longer and can cause scars. Many medicines used to treat acne (including those that are safe to use during pregnancy) can make you more prone to sunburn. And while the sun may help dry out your acne lesions, that help doesn’t come without a price: Too much sun not only increases your risk of skin cancer and causes early aging of the skin, it can also bring on other blotches during pregnancy. Serious breakouts in adults are sometimes tackled with such strong-arm products as Accutane, Retin-A, and other topical retinoids (tretinoin, isotretinoin, tazarotene, and adapalene) — which are all completely off-limits until after you deliver and wean, since they can be absorbed through the skin into your breast milk and your — and your baby’s — bloodstream. more...



What Cosmetic Products Should Pregnant Women Avoid

According to Baby Zone, some women do not realize that products applied to the skin, such as face creams, are absorbed and can affect the developing baby as well. Baby Zone states that many anti-aging products contain retinoids, a chemical that can be dangerous to a developing baby, and should be avoided. Pregnancy.org notes that during the first trimester, acne can be a problem for some women due to the hormonal changes of the body. Using sunscreen during pregnancy is safe and recommended over excessive sun exposure or sun burn, explains Baby Zone. Baby Center states that titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are especially safe as they do not absorb into the skin. According to Baby Center, pregnant women should choose makeup that is "noncomedogenic" or "nonacnegenic," which means they are oil-free and won't clog pores. According to Baby Center, the only risk with regard to hair removal products is the possibility of an allergy. Many women become extra sensitive to products on the skin during pregnancy and the risk of an allergic reaction to chemicals is increased. There are no specific chemicals found in hair removal products that cause problems during pregnancy or to the developing baby. more...



Pregnancy Skin Care : Get That Glow

Pregnancy Skin Care: Get That Glow! Indeed, while pregnancy can leave some lucky ladies looking luscious, for others, all that extra hormonal activity can have the opposite effect, causing a variety of pregnancy skin problems . 1 skin problem to hit women during pregnancy - but there are also a variety of bumps and rashes and discolorations that occur as well, most of them due to hormone activity," says Ellen Marmur, MD, chief of dermatologic and cosmetic surgery at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. Moreover, you might also find that at least some of the tried and true beauty products you relied on to keep your skin glowing before pregnancy are unsafe to use after baby is on board. "These are the most common areas for acne to occur during pregnancy, and if you don't treat it right away, it will continue until you deliver, and sometimes even after baby is born," says Marmur. They are not safe to use during pregnancy," says Jamal, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology and microbiology at NYU Medical Center in New York City. more...



10 Beauty Products You Must Ditch During Pregnancy

It is a thrilling, suspense-ridden process with no certain answers - with a high probability that you will have created the greatest treasure of your life. The high-end products used more exotic ingredients, frequently including chemicals that can cause allergies, even roaming into riskier territory such as cancer-causing ingredients. If you are just having your nails done once every couple of weeks, is that a "safe dose?" The fact is, no one knows. Nicer Nails: Even if your friends know you for having the most flamboyant painted nails, wear naked nails with pride when you are pregnant. Image: The Female View. The Food and Drug Administration has approved Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) for use in chemical tanning. It has been shown not to absorb into the living skin below the dead layer, and is therefore considered safer than suntanning - which is known to cause cancer. However, these approvals do not take into account the risks of inhaling the particles of spray that get into the air during "tanning". Skin lightening products contain chemicals that interfere with enzymatic processes that lead to production of melanin, which darkens the skin. Unfortunately, pregnancy often induces darkening of the skin, and can lead to a pigment "mask" on the face, making the urge to action stronger. The active ingredient in hair removal products is usually some form of thioglycolic acid. There are no studies showing that this chemical is unsafe on the skin during pregnancy. The EU limits the ingredient to a maximum of 5% (as thioglycolic acid) in depilatories (hair removal products). The thioglycolic acid reacts chemically with disulfide bonds in hair. Because these ingredients are aggressive enough to react chemically, and no studies have been done to detect potential reprotoxic effects, we recommend the precautionary principle: Leave these on the shelf until after the pregnancy. more...



Safe skin care during pregnancy

Most pregnant women know that what they put (or don't put) in their bodies is important to the well-being of their growing baby, whether it's the right kind of protein, too much caffeine, or certain types of fish. Most of us slather on oceans of lotions every day, but we don't think about what might be passing the skin barrier and being absorbed into our bodies. The more powerful and targeted products get, the more we need to be careful about what we have in our skin-care regimens during pregnancy. more...



Safe Facial Products during Pregnancy - Pregnancy, Baby Care

Facial changes during pregnancy are the most obvious. This increases the blood circulation in the body and can cause your skin to 'glow'. If you suffered from acne before your pregnancy, the odds are that this condition will be further aggravated now. One of the best ways to treat oily skin and acne is through facials during pregnancy. Remember, your skin is extremely sensitive during pregnancy. While most skin changes are harmless, if any facial changes during pregnancy are accompanied by pain, redness or bleeding, contact your doctor at the earliest. Safe facial products during pregnancy. If you have always been meticulous about facial treatments and looking after your skin, do not fear that all this has to change during your pregnancy. There are a number of safe facial products that can be used during pregnancy. Before one gets into facial treatments during pregnancy that are safe and can help with all the changes taking place with your skin, it is best to emphasize the importance of a healthy balanced diet during your pregnancy. If acne or oily skin is an issue, use safe facial moisturizers during pregnancy that are unscented and 'non-comedogenic.' Products that are 'oil-free' are good if your skin is oily. Many salons offer specially designed body and facial treatments such as the European facial during pregnancy. You can also try the new trend of mineral makeup during pregnancy that uses all-natural ingredients which are oil-free as well. more...



Safe skincare and makeup during pregnancy : the truth

HOME > Terri's Blogs > Safe skincare and makeup during pregnancy: the truth. Safe skincare and makeup during pregnancy: the truth. They are ultimately responsible for the safety of their unborn child and their choices are influenced by understanding exactly which ingredients are safe to use on the skin. The truth is there are many high quality products on the market that can be safely used by women during pregnancy. It is therefore essential to cut through the media myths and understand the truth behind safe skincare during pregnancy. Many women are more sensitive to skin irritation during pregnancy so it is wise to avoid ingredients that may be potentially irritation or drying such as alcohol based products and highly perfumed products. It is important to note that whilst many ingredients are not recommended during pregnancy, this is often a purely cautious approach. Many of the findings and recommendations of ingredient which are safe during pregnancy are based on anecdotal evidence, assumption and animal studies. However, there is no data that these ingredients used on the skin during pregnancy are harmful. It is in the same family as aspirin, an ingredient that is not recommended during pregnancy. Safe essential oils during pregnancy in low concentrations and on small areas of the body: more...



Ingredients To Avoid During Pregnancy - Natural Living for

Choosing safer beauty products is easier when you learn which ingredients are best to avoid during pregnancy. The ingredients below that are suggested to avoid during pregnancy are commonly found in a variety of beauty products and are known or are suspected of being able to make their way through the placenta into the fetus. Ingredients To Avoid During Pregnancy and Why. Look for the many companies that offer phathalate free products, avoid products with "fragrance" on the label and find one of the new phathalate free nail polishes. While we are on the subject of nail products toulenes is another ingredient used in these products you might want to avoid during pregnancy. There is the possibility the chemicals in these products can be absorbed into the skin making this something else that is best to avoid during pregnancy. I hesitate to include essential oils in a list of ingredients to avoid during pregnancy because there are some essential oils that are particularly useful for pregnancy skin care. According to Safe Fetus (a database that provides information on the safety of medications taken during pregnancy and while breast feeding) benzoyl peroxide found in many products used to treat acne is rated a Category C meaning that: To avoid during pregnancy any concerns about lead in lipsticks by choosing from the many natural lipsticks available that will keep you looking pretty and feeling safe. If you are using products made by some of the major manufacturers this is probably true. The safety of ingredients used in our skin care products is being questioned and even less is known about the ability of these ingredients to make it through to the fetus or the effects they may have. You will find some of them listed on this page for pregnancy skin care . more...



Skincare safe products during pregnancy - Skinfo's

Skincare safe products during pregnancy. Luckily, most of these conditions are resolved shortly after delivery; however, there are steps you can take to treat your skin issues while pregnant, as long as you use pregnancy safe skincare products. Here’s an overview of what issues you may experience and how you can safely treat your skin issues while pregnant: Stretch marks: Stretch marks a reddish-purple lines on the abdomen, breasts, and thighs that are caused by the pulling and stretching that skin undergoes during pregnancy. Acne : The pregnancy “glow” that everyone talks about comes from increased oil production in the skin of pregnant women, and unfortunately, this oil can also cause acne , especially around the mouth. You can also use over-the-counter acne products, like astringents, but take special care to avoid products containing benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, or retinoids, which are unsafe for pregnant women to use. Puffiness in the eyelids and face: During the third trimester, pregnant women experience increased blood circulation, which can cause the face and eyelids to puff up. Retinoids and salicylic acid have been shown to cause birth defects and pregnancy complications, and doctors recommend that pregnant women avoid the use of such products. more...



Skin Care During Pregnancy

Pregnant Women – What Skin Care Product Ingredients are Safe? Patients ask us about safe pregnancy skin care, and which ingredients they should avoid while pregnant and nursing, especially when it comes to pregnancy and acne. There are actually very few studies evaluating the safety during pregnancy of the active ingredients in many skin care products. What skin care product ingredients are safe in pregnancy? Most skin care ingredients in drugstore and dermatology non-prescription products are safe in pregnancy. For acne, which is one of the most common problems in pregnancy, the only truly safe and best skincare products to use during pregnancy are the glycolic acid or other AHA (alpha hydroxy acid) products and peels. What ingredients in skin care products or medications should you avoid in pregnancy? Please see the addendum for the FDA pregnancy risk categories: For example, IPL treatments (photorejuvenation or photofacials), are really just the application of light on the surface of the skin, and we have never seen any reports of pregnancy related problems. Other topical acne treatment options are topical erythromycin or clindamycin (both class B), or azelaic acid (class B) for the treatment of acne, rosacea, and hyperpigmentation during pregnancy. We recommend avoiding this medication for safe pregnancy skin care. This is an all-natural and a 100% safe option for pregnant and breast-feeding women. Glycolic peels are safe in pregnancy but may make melasma worse depending on the time of year of your pregnancy and how much time you spend outdoors. Studies in pregnant women show the medication causes no increased risk to the fetus during pregnancy. Studies are unavailable and animal studies have shown a risk to the fetus or are also lacking. more...



Safety of skin care products during pregnancy

The role of the topical retinoids in these cases remains controversial, 15 – 18 as 2 prospective studies that examined use during the first trimester of pregnancy with 96 and 106 women did not find an increased risk of major malformations or evidence of retinoid embryopathy. 19 , 20 However, until data on larger cohorts are collected, women should not be encouraged to use topical retinoids during pregnancy. 2 , 3 No studies on the use of this preparation in pregnant patients have been published; however, systemic effects on a pregnant woman and her child would not be expected and therefore use of this product during pregnancy would not be of concern. 26 No studies have been conducted in pregnancy on topical use; however, as such a relatively small proportion is absorbed through the skin, it is unlikely to pose any risk to a developing baby. 27 Studies examining the use of glycolic acid in human pregnancy have not been conducted; however, using topical glycolic acid during pregnancy should not be of concern, as only a minimal amount is expected to be absorbed systemically. 9 A single study has been published involving the use of hydroquinone during pregnancy with no increase in adverse events; however, the sample size of pregnant women was small. These products contain dihydroxyacetone in concentrations ranging from 1% to 15%, and when applied topically, systemic levels are minimal (0.5%) 12 ; therefore, use during pregnancy would not be of concern. When addressing issues of hair removal, or reducing the appearance of hair, various topical agents are available, such as depilatory and hair-bleaching creams. In addition, although they might permeate the skin, the systemic absorption of these ions is minimal and therefore they do not increase serum levels and would not be considered a problem for use during pregnancy. Apart from hydroquinone (which is absorbed systemically in fairly substantial amounts and should be used very sparingly) and topical retinoids (owing to the troubling case reports), skin care products are not expected to increase the risk of malformations or other adverse effects on the developing fetus. more...



Is It Safe To Get Facial During Pregnancy

Let’s look at some of the things you need to know about facials and pregnancy, starting with why they can be great for you: The compliments pour in and help you ignore the minor discomforts of pregnancy. Leading dermatologists and beauticians recommend that in general, a basic facial, without the use of harsh chemicals, heat treatments and long-drawn out massages, is quite safe. In fact, if you’re looking for a relaxing and refreshing time, a gentle facial can make you feel and look great. However, it’s important to know that your skin absorbs all the chemicals that are applied to it; these can enter the bloodstream and ultimately your baby’s bloodstream too. If you’re looking for a soothing, relaxing and calming experience, a basic facial can certainly give you that feeling of being pampered. The caveat is to be aware of what products are being used and what kind of treatments you’re going in for. While making the appointment at your beauty salon, mention that you’re pregnant. If it’s your first post-pregnancy facial, talk to the salon manager before-hand. Get a complete list of the products and ingredients. Most pregnant women love the feeling of being pampered in a beauty salon and the attention and good vibes showered on them. With a little care and caution, facials during pregnnacy can be quite safe and enjoyable. more...



Chemicals to Avoid During Pregnancy Post 3

Not regulated well by the federal government, laws restricting what skin-care companies can put into their products are virtually nonexistent, so it is truly up to us to become educated consumers when it comes to what we put on our bodies and to learn what chemicals to avoid during pregnancy.  As doctor Debra Jaliman says on her blog on Web MD , "I can't understand why warnings for pregnant women are not on more skin care products." While I would recommend looking at the labels on your skin care products and avoiding anything potentially hazardous (using the current Natural Home & Garden article, on newsstands now, or the Environmental Working Group's Skin Deep Database as a starting point), one of the most important ingredients to avoid is retinol. A vitamin A derivative that encourages skin to regenerate, retinol is in a wide array of skin-care products, particularly those touted as "anti-aging." Because retinol encourages cell regeneration, it can encourage skin to "renew" itself, helping it appear younger. However, that new skin is more sensitive to sun damage, and can actually increase risk of sun damage and skin cancer when used in daytime products. Nonetheless, the desire to slap "anti-aging" on the packaging has led more and more skin-care products to contain retinol. Some studies have found that retinoids (the class of vitamin A derivatives retinol is part of) in high doses can be harmful to unborn children. Found in foundations, lipsticks, sunscreens and cleansers, retinol in daytime products will "actually make skin age faster because it is more susceptible to the sun, no matter the amount of SPF protection promised on the foundation or sunscreen," Jaliman writes . If you are pregnant and you have been using skin-care products with retinol, don't panic. more...



What Skincare Products Are Safe to Use During Pregnancy

What Skincare Products Are Safe to Use During Pregnancy? Board certified dermatologist, Brandith Irwin, MD, explains how to choose safe skincare products during pregnancy. If even the idea of something in a product makes you uncomfortable, why not just stop it for nine months? A recent blog provides information about which skin care products you should use while you are pregnant. "In general, the FDA does not require studies of over the counter, non prescription products in pregnancy, because any systemic absorption from the skin is minimal to zero depending on the product. Most skin care ingredients in drugstore and dermatology non-prescription products are safe in pregnancy, whereas some prescription medications, both oral and topical, are not. It is recommended that you talk to your doctor before using any prescription skin care products during pregnancy. For acne, which is one of the most common problems in pregnancy, the only true safe products are the glycolic acid or other AHA (alpha hydroxy acid) products and peels. To learn more about which skincare products and dermatology treatments are safe during pregnancy, and which are not, please read Skin Tour.com's entire article on Skin Care During Pregnancy . Brandith Irwin not only provides women with expert articles on cosmetic treatments and skincare product information, she also answers questions from users to help them get the most out of their skincare treatments. more...



Pregnancy acne : What's the best treatment? - Mayo Clinic

You have many options for treating acne during pregnancy, including self-care and medication. Pregnancy acne isn't a special form of acne. Many women simply seem to have trouble with acne during pregnancy. To treat pregnancy acne, start with self-care: Beyond self-care, you might consider medication as a treatment for pregnancy acne. Options for treating pregnancy acne with medication include erythromycin (Erygel), clindamycin (Cleocin T, Clindagel, others) and azelaic acid (Azelex, Finacea). However, opinions about using benzoyl peroxide to treat pregnancy acne are mixed. more...



Pregnancy - Proofing Your Beauty Regimen

Is your beauty routine safe when you're pregnant? And if you didn't know it, the product labels tell you. It's a lot less clear, though, which beauty products may not be safe for pregnant women. If you're unsure what's safe, take specific products to your doctor for analysis, recommends John Bailey, Ph D, chief scientist for the Personal Care Products Council. Peroxide, the active ingredient in teeth whiteners , is safe for adults - even if you swallow some during the bleaching process, says Colleen Olitsky, DMD, a cosmetic dentist in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Hairspray and Nail Polish: Should You or Shouldn't You? Phthalates, which are found in many hair sprays and nail polishes, have been studied for a potential risk of causing birth defects . Once the polish dries, there's little risk to your baby, since chemicals aren't absorbed through the nails. Bronzing Your Belly: Self-Tanners and Sunscreens. more...



Pregnancy - Safe Skin Care : The Best Products and Ingredients

Pregnancy-Safe Skin Care: The Best Products & Ingredients to Use. Your skin care routine is one of those adjustments, but it’s so confusing to know which ingredients are safe and which ones aren’t. That’s where I come in, I know from experience, what ingredients are beneficial for your skin, which ones are a big NO, and the different products and brands to help make your pregnancy a little less stressful! Make a list of your beauty and skin care products and review them with your ob-gyn and dermatologist. Read ALL of the ingredients labels for all of your products. I often inform my clients that if they want to get a facial while pregnant make sure the esthetician is well aware, ask what products they are going to use, and when in doubt – bring your own pregnancy safe products and ask your esthetician to use those instead. Remember it’s temporary and there are a lot of natural choices to get your skin back in balance. The ingredients in this product should be safe for use during pregnancy, though I do always urge you to check with your doctor for approval. Are they okay with their Vitamin A ingredients and Salysic Acid (in the face wash) to use during pregnancy? Generally speaking, yes, Eminence Organic’s Clear Skin Probiotic Moisturizer and Face Wash, Clear Skin and 8 Greens Serum should be okay for use during pregnancy. more...



10 Best Pregnancy Acne Products

The product contains tea tree oil which is a powerful anti-microbial, anti-acne and antioxidant. The cinnamon in the product contains antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Priced at INR 175 for 120 g. The product absorbs excess oil and other impurities that can cause acne. Priced at INR 199 for 75 g. Priced at INR 155 for 70 g. It works as an ideal base for makeup and leaves the skin fresh and pure. Priced at INR 1495 for 30 ml. These are acne products safe for pregnancy and for topical use. more...



New Mommy Beauty : What Skin Care Ingredients to Avoid

It seems easy to imagine that if you are pregnant (or are trying to get pregnant) that you should probably start taking those prenatals and avoid the pregnancy no-no items like alcohol, tobacco, etc. The truth is that there are ingredients in your night cream and acne spot treatment that have not been proven safe for use during pregnancy, or even worse, have been linked to birth defects. Personally, I am going the conservative route and avoiding ingredients that have not been proven to be safe in pregnancy. Ellen Marmur, whose book Simple Skin Beauty I wrote about a few days ago, says "be on the safe side and ask your ob/gyn about anything that you think might be harmful." I also want to add that even if you've been reassured that something is safe, if it makes you uncomfortable, just avoid it. There are so many products on the market now, it should be easy to avoid an ingredient. While Retin A and over the counter retinoids are not as strongly linked to birth defects as Accutane, they are all the same class of drug and as such are on pretty much every MD's list of no-no ingredients. The retinoids are Vitamin A derivatives, and I've seen quite a few lists advising to avoid topical Vitamin A as well, so it's made my list. • All Hydroxy Acids: From citric acid to salicylic acid, pretty much all of the hydroxy acids either are not safe or simply don't have enough information to say "sure, go crazy and rub this all over you." So, the official word is that all of they hydroxy acids, alpha and beta, have pregnancy categories that recommend avoidance, with 1 exception. I've seen a few books that say Glycolic Acid is fine, and there are many physicians that tell this to their patients. Both are also considered safe for pregnancy and breast feeding. Much is the same for any Hyaluronic Acid that you apply to the surface of the skin. Be aware that if you're allergic to sulfa drugs you should avoid this ingredient, but I've seen it as the active ingredient in many "pregnancy safe" acne treatments and is probably fine. I also looked up each drug in the book Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation , which is even more complete. • Hydroquinone: While there is no data on Hydroquinone in humans, and no studies have found the levels achieved with topical use, hydroquinone is likely safe to use during nursing. more...



12 Cosmetic Ingredients to Avoid During Pregnancy

Beta hydroxy acids: Salicylic acid, 3-hydroxypropionic acid, trethocanic acid and tropic acid. Diethanolamine (DEA): Found in hair and body products; stay clear of diethanolamine, oleamide DEA, lauramide DEA and cocamide DEA. Formaldehyde: Found in hair straightening treatments, nail polishes and eyelash glue; look for formaldehyde, quaternium-15, dimethyl-dimethyl (DMDM), hydantoin, imidazolidinyl urea, diazolidinyl urea, sodium hydroxymethylglycinate, and 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol (bromopol). Phthalates: Found in products with synthetic fragrances and nail polishes; avoid diethyl and dibutyl especially. Retinol: Vitamin A, retinoic acid, retinyl palmitate, retinaldehyde, adapalene, tretinoin, tazarotene and isotretinoin. Thioglycolic acid: Found in chemical hair removers; can also be labeled acetyl mercaptan, mercaptoacetate, mercaptoacetic acid and thiovanic acid. more...



Which Beauty Products Are Safe During Pregnancy

Which Beauty Products Are Safe During Pregnancy? Of course you still want to look and feel attractive during your pregnancy, but which beauty products are safe to use during pregnancy? Found in in many household items, such as shower curtains and plastic wrap, and beauty products like nail polish, hair spray, and synthetic fragrances, phthalates are known to disrupt hormones. Scientists and consumer groups have long expressed concern about the ubiquity of products containing phthalates. In 2008, Congress restricted the usage of phthalates in baby toys and other infant-care products after studies reported that infants exposed to these products had significantly higher levels of phthalates in their urine. Avoid products that have “fragrance” on the ingredient list. The FDA has found no link between the low levels of lead found in lipstick and safety concerns, but research is limited and consumer groups have pushed for lead levels to be capped. Although the potential risks of lead in lipstick are slim, we recommend looking for lead-free products. Two skin care ingredients are definite “no’s” during pregnancy: retinoids and salicyclic acid. Both have been labeled category C drugs by the FDA—animal studies have shown a link between the product and birth defects. Avoid retinoids and salicylic acid. To avoid retinoids, steer clear of these ingredients and products: more...



Safe skin care during pregnancy - BabyCenter Canada

The vast majority of these lotions and products are safe to use since they have low absorption rates. Avoid the use of oral retinoids during pregnancy. Whether salicylic acid is safe during pregnancy depends somewhat on how you use it, the p H balance, the strength, and the quantity you use (Bozzo, Chua-Gocheco, Einarson 2011). Use some caution and consult your midwife, doctor or a dermatologist to determine if the way you are using your product containing salicylic acid and the chemical makeup of it are safe for pregnancy. While soy-based lotions and facial products are generally safe to use, but may make common pregnancy skin changes like the mask of pregnancy (dark splotches on facial skin) worse. And as your mom always told you: Don't forget the sunscreen. Sunscreens, including those with ingredients that penetrate the skin, are considered safe. You can use titanium dioxide or zinc oxide as they are good sunscreens and do not penetrate your skin. These are safe and will not affect the health of your baby. These products use ingredients that primarily sit on top of the skin and don't cause irritation for most people. more...



Safety of skin care products during pregnancy

Topical treatment options for acne often include retinoids, antibacterials, and agents such as benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid. The role of the topical retinoids in these cases remains controversial, 15-18 as 2 prospective studies that examined use during the first trimester of pregnancy with 96 and 106 women did not find an increased risk of major malformations or evidence of retinoid embryopathy. 2,3 No studies on the use of this preparation in pregnant patients have been published; however, systemic effects on a pregnant woman and her child would not be expected and therefore use of this product during pregnancy would not be of concern. Topical salicylic acid is an ingredient in a number of cosmetic and acne products and systemic absorption varies. 27 Studies examining the use of glycolic acid in human pregnancy have not been conducted; however, using topical glycolic acid during pregnancy should not be of concern, as only a minimal amount is expected to be absorbed systemically. It has been estimated that 35% to 45% is systemically absorbed following topical use in humans.9 A single study has been published involving the use of hydroquinone during pregnancy with no increase in adverse events; however, the sample size of pregnant women was small. Topical hair removal and bleaching agents. In addition, although they might permeate the skin, the systemic absorption of these ions is minimal and therefore they do not increase serum levels and would not be considered a problem for use during pregnancy. Metals and the skin. Topical effects and systemic absorption. Minor malformations characteristic of the retinoic acid embryopathy and other birth outcomes in children of women exposed to topical tretinoin during early pregnancy. Use of oral and topical agents for acne in pregnancy. The cosmetic use of skin-lightening products during pregnancy in Dakar, Senegal: a common and potentially hazardous practice. more...



Glow For It

Here's what researchers have uncovered about the hair, skin, teeth, and body treatments you may be pondering to perk up your pregnancy. Coloring agents can pass through the scalp and into your bloodstream, but in such minute quantities that they are generally thought to be harmless to a developing fetus. A recent study from Columbia University confirmed that pregnant women are routinely exposed to these chemicals in the environment, and Italian researchers found that exposure appears to shorten pregnancy slightly. "The available data do not support an association between its use and problems with the baby," says Dr. Having a massage can be a great way to relieve the stress and discomforts of pregnancy - and may even enhance your unborn child's well-being. "Massage reduces stress hormones, and because of that, it may lower the risk of premature birth," says Tiffany Field, Ph. Pregnancy massage is usually performed while you're lying on your side, with the focus on your back and legs. It's important that a therapist avoids your feet, however, as stimulating the back of the ankle and the Achilles tendon can stimulate contractions, says Field. Although they are applied to the skin, not ingested, and there is no proof of a connection, many experts now advise their pregnant patients to avoid them. But microdermabrasion and chemical peels that use glycolic acid are not considered a problem. While teeth bleachers and whiteners are safe for most people, there's no research on their use during pregnancy, according to Kimberly Harms, spokesperson for the American Dental Association, who recommends pregnant women avoid bleaching. more...



8 Beauty No - Nos When You're Preg - O - Total Beauty and Barber

I have been so overwhelmed with what I should and should not use during pregnancy. By cheryl_arguin Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 06:57 PM Report as inappropriate. Am I the only one who really, really hates it when people say "Preg-O"? By Little Bunny Thursday, January 10, 2013 at 10:01 AM Report as inappropriate. By Erica F 123 Saturday, December 29, 2012 at 11:55 AM Report as inappropriate. By cheerio9551 Thursday, December 20, 2012 at 10:08 PM Report as inappropriate. By nicky22 Saturday, December 1, 2012 at 08:37 PM Report as inappropriate. By Lamexicana1 Saturday, December 1, 2012 at 04:58 PM Report as inappropriate. By Nin Saturday, September 1, 2012 at 11:00 PM Report as inappropriate. By charlize_adrienne Tuesday, April 17, 2012 at 06:32 PM Report as inappropriate. By beautybody Thursday, March 29, 2012 at 12:13 PM Report as inappropriate. I'm sure some products are better than others to use, but are people using that much of a certain product that it could be absorbed by the body that fast? more...



Safe Hair Removal During Pregnancy - What to Expect

Safe Hair Removal During Pregnancy. While you should avoid some hair removal methods during pregnancy, there are a number of ways to safely get hair-free. You’re admiring your fresh-faced pregnancy glow and newly luxurious locks in the mirror when you notice something not quite as attractive: thick upper lip hair. Luckily, the extra fuzz is temporary — your hair should return to normal about six months after you give birth. Don’t feel bad if you borrow a habit from your hubby and start shaving facial hair as well: Sideburns, upper lip hair and chin stubble are easy to take care of daily with a razor (and don’t worry that shaving it off will make the hair coarser — it’s just a hair-removal myth ). And don’t share a razor with your partner, which could open you up to infections. Waxing and sugaring — where a heated sugar mixture is spread on the skin and then lifted off to remove hair — both provide a longer-term solution to your hair woes and are fine if pregnancy hasn’t made your skin too sensitive. As your belly grows you have a harder time seeing — and reaching — your lady parts, a professional salon wax or sugar is usually the best hair removal option during pregnancy. Although hair removal creams, gels, lotions, aerosols and roll-ons may seem like an easy option, the science is still out on whether they’re safe during pregnancy. If you feel you must use them, get the OK from your doctor first and make sure to apply in a well-ventilated area after testing the product on a small patch of skin first. While you may have already masked unwanted hair growth with bleach in the past, since it’s applied directly to your skin there’s a chance you absorb some of the chemicals and possibly pass them on to your unborn child. Laser Hair Removal and Electrolysis. Permanent hair removal solutions like laser and electrolysis are at best unnecessary and at worst dangerous during pregnancy. Bottom line: since no reliable studies have been done to determine if either laser hair removal or electrolysis are safe for pregnant women — and because your extra unwanted hair should disappear about six months after delivering! more...



Which beauty products are safe during pregnancy? - Today's

Which beauty products are safe during pregnancy? Here’s the truth about the safety of beauty products during pregnancy — straight from the pros. It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the many warnings and old wives’ tales surrounding beauty products and pregnancy. You want to be on the safe side, but you don’t want to forgo all grooming for nine months. Plus, sticking to your beauty routine can be a source of comfort during pregnancy. “Your body goes through all these changes that you have no control over,” says Jolene Ali, owner of Sweet Momma, a spa in Edmonton that specializes in providing safe beauty treatments for expectant moms. Hair removal wax Professional quality wax is safe, especially since it doesn’t contain the chemical preservatives (like parabens) that most other beauty products do. “Our main concern is pain, especially since blood flow increases during pregnancy,” says Ali. Hair dye This is the most common beauty product concern, says Gideon Koren, director of the Motherisk Program at Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children. Nail polish There’s no hard evidence that nail polish is dangerous during pregnancy, says Koren, citing a study that looked at pregnant beauticians working in salons. Vitamin A “It’s pretty clear that no Vitamin A beauty products should be used in pregnancy because there have been reports of birth defects in women with topical use alone,” says Zip. more...



Pregnancy Friendly Skin Care Products - 15 Minute Beauty

Pregnancy Friendly Skin Care Products. To create that list of 8 maternity oriented skin care lines that are safe, I went through the ingredients in a ton of skin care lines to find the ones that fit my criteria for pregnancy safe skincare . There are also a lot of great products that are pregnancy friendly, but not necessarily from a full pregnancy skin care line. There are a lot of really great skin care lines in those big box stores, and many of their products are pregnancy friendly! more...



Best Face Forward : Safe Beauty Products for Pregnancy and

Best Face Forward: Safe Beauty Products for Pregnancy and Nursing. And while some products are not safe to use in pregnancy, the good news is there are plenty of alternatives and plenty of products that are safe to use. These lotions and sprays stay mostly on the surface of the skin with only minimal absorption, which makes them safe for you to use during pregnancy or while you are breastfeeding. Acne, a common complaint for many expecting women, is an unfortunate and common side effect of the hormonal changes that accompany pregnancy. Steer clear of products that cover more surface area or sit on the skin for longer time periods—they are more likely to be absorbed into your skin. Leslie Baumann, Ph D, the author of The Skin Type Solution and a professor of dermatology at the University of Miami, says a facial cleanser for acne that has two percent or less salicylic acid is safe for use. Most experts agree that pregnant and nursing women should avoid products containing retinoids. When used according to the instructions on the package, hair removes and depilatories (such as Nair or Neet) are safe for women to use during pregnancy and breastfeeding—a relief to many women, since shaving during pregnancy can be especially difficult. As with anything that is applied to the skin, especially in large doses, DEET can be absorbed through your skin and enter the bloodstream. Products containing soy are generally safe to use, but “Soy can make the ‘mask of pregnancy’ (dark splotches on facial skin) worse, as can oil of bergamot, which is in many organic products,” says Dr. more...



Pregnancy Skin Care Tips and Products - Paula's Choice

Because some ingredients—both from prescription drugs and from some skin-care products—are absorbed into the body when applied to skin, you need to know what's safe for use during pregnancy and what to avoid. Although it is always important for you to check with your own physician, as a general rule, most skin-care products such as cleansers, toners, moisturizers, eye creams, scrubs, and lip balms that do not contain over-the-counter ingredients regulated by the FDA are fine for use throughout your pregnancy. Prescription topical antibiotics, such as erythromycin and clindamycin are considered safe for use during pregnancy. It is a prescription only topical medication considered safe for use during pregnancy and has good research showing it can improve brown skin discolorations. Stretch marks that occur during or after pregnancy are caused by the skin becoming abnormally stretched and expanded for a period of time. Massaging your skin with a serum or non-fragrant plant oil while you are pregnant can help it become more pliable and reduce the potential of stretch marks. Metronidazole (the active ingredient in Metro Cream, Metro Gel, and Metro Lotion) is considered safe for use during pregnancy. It is safe for use during pregnancy. Although the information above isn't meant to be exhaustive, it should give you a clear idea of what's OK to use during pregnancy and what should be avoided. Most important, you can achieve your skin-care goals during pregnancy, and that's sure to put your mind at ease! With Paula’s Choice Skincare, you can get (and keep) the best skin of your life! more...



What Skin Care Products Are Safe During Pregnancy

There are a number of skin care products which should be safe during pregnancies. Nevertheless, there are plenty of good skin care products that can be used during pregnancy. These would include many of the antioxidants. However, stay away from the antioxidant soy since this has estrogenic factors which could cause problems, perhaps to the fetus and more definitely to the skin (intensifying chloasma, the "mask of pregnancy".) Do not use cosmetic creams during pregnancy. There are many reasons for this including safety but also that many skin issues that mayb be bothering you may resolve after pregnancy. The reasons for not doing the fillers and botox in pregnancy are; The exact effect of fillers and botox on fetus is unknown. Some medications or products can be completely safe for the mother but harm the growing fetus. In terms of skin care the biggest concern is Vit A based products as it is known to cause birth defects. Other products are relatively safe but the best thing is to use nothing more than a moisturizer like Aveeno Baby Products. more...