Ingredients To Avoid In Skincare Products During Pregnancy

Safe skin care during pregnancy

While soy-based lotions and facial products are generally safe to use, "Soy can make the ' mask of pregnancy ' (dark splotches on facial skin) worse, as can oil of bergamot, which is in many organic products," she says. Soy has estrogenic effects, which can make those dark patches, also known as melasma or chloasma , worse, Baumann explains. "The 'active soy' found in some product lines is okay, however, because the estrogenic components have been taken out." If you have dark skin or melasma, avoid these products, or choose 'active soy' products instead. If you're dealing with pregnancy-induced acne, a dermatologist can likely give you a safe topical antibiotic, advises Baumann. But if you prefer to avoid yet another doctor appointment, Baumann recommends using a facial wash that contains no more than 2 percent salicylic acid (look for the percentage on the product label). more...



Skin Care During Pregnancy

Pregnant Women – What Skin Care Product Ingredients are Safe? Patients ask us about safe pregnancy skin care, and which ingredients they should avoid while pregnant and nursing, especially when it comes to pregnancy and acne. There are actually very few studies evaluating the safety during pregnancy of the active ingredients in many skin care products. What skin care product ingredients are safe in pregnancy? Most skin care ingredients in drugstore and dermatology non-prescription products are safe in pregnancy. For acne, which is one of the most common problems in pregnancy, the only truly safe and best skincare products to use during pregnancy are the glycolic acid or other AHA (alpha hydroxy acid) products and peels. What ingredients in skin care products or medications should you avoid in pregnancy? Please see the addendum for the FDA pregnancy risk categories: For example, IPL treatments (photorejuvenation or photofacials), are really just the application of light on the surface of the skin, and we have never seen any reports of pregnancy related problems. Other topical acne treatment options are topical erythromycin or clindamycin (both class B), or azelaic acid (class B) for the treatment of acne, rosacea, and hyperpigmentation during pregnancy. We recommend avoiding this medication for safe pregnancy skin care. This is an all-natural and a 100% safe option for pregnant and breast-feeding women. Glycolic peels are safe in pregnancy but may make melasma worse depending on the time of year of your pregnancy and how much time you spend outdoors. Studies in pregnant women show the medication causes no increased risk to the fetus during pregnancy. Studies are unavailable and animal studies have shown a risk to the fetus or are also lacking. more...



Pregnancy Safe Skin Care : What to Use and What to Avoid

These color changes are triggered by hormones that increase the production of melanin in the skin. All of these tips are not only safe, but highly encouraged throughout your pregnancy to make sure that you and your little one are getting all the primp and pamper you deserve! You may get that pregnancy glow or you may develop more oily and acne-prone skin. Our Citrus Mint Facial Cleanser is an excellent first step to removing oils and impurities on the skin. For a moisturizer, we recommend topping this skin care routine off with our Herbal Facial Oil for Oily and Acne Prone Skin . They are not recommended for use undiluted directly on the skin, however. Are Annmarie Skin Care Products Safe During Pregnancy? Common questions we’ve received from our customers are either regarding the white willow bark in our Herbal Facial Oil for Oily/Acne Prone Skin or the use of essential oils throughout. Are you more cautious with your skin care products now that you’re pregnant? Your Perfectly Pampered Pregnancy: Beauty, Health, and Lifestyle Advice for the Modern Mother-to-Be. more...



Pregnancy Skincare : Dos and Don'ts - Skin Care Products

Some topical ingredients will get absorbed into the bloodstream, and dermatologists as well as OB/GYNs alike may warn you about certain prescription medications and potent ingredients to avoid. Pregnant women should not use hydroquinone for skin lightening and melasma.” He added that Tetracycline has been shown to cross the placenta, which can cause staining of the baby’s teeth and affect the way the skeleton develops so it should be avoided as well. If you have been using something that is not advisable, ask your doctor or pharmacist for a suitable alternative that is safe to use during pregnancy and breastfeeding. It nourishes, smooths and maintains great hydration.” She also recommends products that are ideal for pregnant skin. “I look for products that are allergy-tested and free of parabens, fragrance, and harsh chemicals, and perfect for even the most sensitive skin. “A healthy scalp is the foundation for beautiful hair during any season Clear Scalp and Hair Beauty Therapy Mask with cactus is a deeply intensive hydrating mask that nourishes and gives hair resilience.” As any mother knows, pregnancy can be a wild hormonal ride resulting in acne and even melasma, sometimes called the “mask of pregnancy.” Florida Dermatologist Dr. “Topical antibiotics such as clindamycin and erythromycin fall into pregnancy category B, which means there are no proven risks in humans.  “Using oral antibiotics during pregnancy should be discussed with your physician and should be used when the benefits outweigh the risks,” Woolery-Lloyd advises. Other natural ingredients that have been proven to be helpful in some acne studies and are safe to use during pregnancy are tea tree oil, a natural antibiotic; green tea, a popular natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory; and lactic acid, which occurs naturally in our bodies. Brightening ingredients that are safe to use during pregnancy include licorice extract, green tea, lactic acid, and niacinimide (vitamin B 3). “The products that I consider safe to use during pregnancy include: mineral oil, Vaseline, Aquaphor , Pond’s Cold Cream , sunscreen with only minerals in it such as Aveeno Mineralguard SPF 50 .” Her go to for acne treatment during pregnancy includes benzoyl peroxide, glycolic acid pads, and azeleic acid in prescription medications Finacea® and Azelex®. Products and ingredients to avoid during pregnancy, according to Prystowsky, also include sunscreens that may be absorbed into the body, cosmeceuticals with peptides, salicylic acid, Rogaine® for hair loss, hydroquinone, and BOTOX®, though it has been used safely to treat pregnant women with migraines. “Otherwise, while nursing I would continue the rest of the pregnancy restrictions because of concerns that products may get into the milk and have an untoward effect on the baby,” she says. more...



What Skin Care Products to Avoid During Pregnancy

Many of these products can contain chemicals and ingredients that expectant mothers should avoid. Here are some suggestions of what skin care products to avoid during pregnancy. However, many cosmetic products contain ingredients that can be harmful to both mother and baby. While you might intend to protect your skin and prevent sun damage, using sun-protecting products with specific ingredients should be avoided during pregnancy. The best way to find products appropriate for your skin and your health is to visit your dermatologist and get their expert advice. Dermatologists are trained on the healthiest options and latest skincare products and will be able to recommend products that are best for you. If you are shopping on your own, be sure to avoid all chemical peels, retinoids, salicylic acids and any products containing harsh chemical ingredients. Check your medicine cabinet and cosmetic products for other potential dangers. Mendelson is wonderful resource to consult if you are pregnant and wondering which products to use and to avoid over the coming months. more...



New Mommy Beauty : What Skin Care Ingredients to Avoid

It seems easy to imagine that if you are pregnant (or are trying to get pregnant) that you should probably start taking those prenatals and avoid the pregnancy no-no items like alcohol, tobacco, etc. The truth is that there are ingredients in your night cream and acne spot treatment that have not been proven safe for use during pregnancy, or even worse, have been linked to birth defects. Personally, I am going the conservative route and avoiding ingredients that have not been proven to be safe in pregnancy. Ellen Marmur, whose book Simple Skin Beauty I wrote about a few days ago, says "be on the safe side and ask your ob/gyn about anything that you think might be harmful." I also want to add that even if you've been reassured that something is safe, if it makes you uncomfortable, just avoid it. There are so many products on the market now, it should be easy to avoid an ingredient. While Retin A and over the counter retinoids are not as strongly linked to birth defects as Accutane, they are all the same class of drug and as such are on pretty much every MD's list of no-no ingredients. The retinoids are Vitamin A derivatives, and I've seen quite a few lists advising to avoid topical Vitamin A as well, so it's made my list. • All Hydroxy Acids: From citric acid to salicylic acid, pretty much all of the hydroxy acids either are not safe or simply don't have enough information to say "sure, go crazy and rub this all over you." So, the official word is that all of they hydroxy acids, alpha and beta, have pregnancy categories that recommend avoidance, with 1 exception. I've seen a few books that say Glycolic Acid is fine, and there are many physicians that tell this to their patients. Both are also considered safe for pregnancy and breast feeding. Much is the same for any Hyaluronic Acid that you apply to the surface of the skin. Be aware that if you're allergic to sulfa drugs you should avoid this ingredient, but I've seen it as the active ingredient in many "pregnancy safe" acne treatments and is probably fine. I also looked up each drug in the book Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation , which is even more complete. • Hydroquinone: While there is no data on Hydroquinone in humans, and no studies have found the levels achieved with topical use, hydroquinone is likely safe to use during nursing. more...



Ingredients to Avoid - Organic Beauty Talk

The skin is the body’s largest organ and absorbs what you put onto it. Always read the ingredient labels and know what’s in your products. The “Terrible Touch-Me-Nots” (as they were presented to me back in 2001) are ingredients to AVOID in personal care, beauty and skin care products. Commercial products with harmful petroleum ingredients can plasticize and “constipate” your skin, making germs more likely to get in and toxins less likely to get out of your body. Every day we use products that we think are safe; but the truth is that most of these products are NOT safe – and manufacturers don’t have to tell us so. Bottom line—always read the ingredient labels and know what’s in your products. In the United States however, they are still used despite the fact that Americans may be exposed to them 10-20 times per day with products such as shampoos, shaving creams and bubble baths. Other possible side effects include weakening  the immune system and cancer. Absorption of certain colors can cause depletion of oxygen in the body and death. Polyethylene Glycol (PEG): potentially carcinogenic petroleum ingredient that can alter and reduce the skin’s natural moisture factor. This could increase the appearance of aging and leave you more vulnerable to bacteria. It adjusts the melting point and thickens products. They easily penetrate the skin and can weaken protein and cellular structure. SLS may also damage the skins immune system by causing layers to separate and inflame. more...



10 skin care ingredients to avoid during pregnancy

Look for skin care products that are free of questionable ingredients to keep your baby healthy and happy. The products you put on your body can affect your baby as much as if not more so than the foods you eat. Here's a list of skin care ingredients that you should avoid during pregnancy. Whether you were taking hydroquinone pre-pregnancy or are considering using it to treat the dark patches of skin that sometimes develop during pregnancy (also called the mask of pregnancy), this is one product to avoid until after your baby is born. Studies have shown that as much as 45 percent of this medication is absorbed into the skin after topical application, and while no studies have yet been conducted on the effect of hydroquinone on a fetus, there is just too much of the chemical in your bloodstream after use to justify the risk. But the ingredient — a known carcinogen — is still commonly found in personal care products made for adults such as hair straightening treatments, nail polish and eyelash glue. Look for nail polishes that are toluene-, phthalate- and formaldehyde-free. Together, they are known as the "toxic trio," and they form a potent combination of toxins that you want to avoid at all times, especially during pregnancy. If you can't handle the look of your nails in the buff, look for nail polishes that are toluene-, formaldehyde- and phthalate-free . While the verdict is still out on whether or not hair dye is safe to use during pregnancy, it's important to note that many formulas contain chemicals like ammonia, which can irritate the skin and lungs. So it's best to steer clear of these both during and after your pregnancy. That could be unhealthy for both you and your baby. While there are no studies about the effect that this chemical has on a growing baby, it's important to note that the European Union limits the amount of thioglycolic acid that can be used in products to 5 percent whereas products sold in the U. So why waste money on treatments that may be, at best, ineffective and, at worst, harmful to your baby? more...



Pregnancy - Proofing Your Beauty Regimen

Is your beauty routine safe when you're pregnant? And if you didn't know it, the product labels tell you. It's a lot less clear, though, which beauty products may not be safe for pregnant women. If you're unsure what's safe, take specific products to your doctor for analysis, recommends John Bailey, Ph D, chief scientist for the Personal Care Products Council. Peroxide, the active ingredient in teeth whiteners , is safe for adults - even if you swallow some during the bleaching process, says Colleen Olitsky, DMD, a cosmetic dentist in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Hairspray and Nail Polish: Should You or Shouldn't You? Phthalates, which are found in many hair sprays and nail polishes, have been studied for a potential risk of causing birth defects . Once the polish dries, there's little risk to your baby, since chemicals aren't absorbed through the nails. Bronzing Your Belly: Self-Tanners and Sunscreens. more...



Pregnancy - Proofing Your Beauty Regimen

Bronzing Your Belly: Self-Tanners and Sunscreens continued. Use a non-chemical sunscreen and wear a hat and other protective clothing while out in the sun. Limit your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. And 2 p.m., when the sun’s rays are most intense. Use sunscreen that contains zinc oxide and titanium dioxide instead. It is safe to wash your face with warm water and a gentle cleanser two times a day. "It's thought that only a small amount of hair -treatment chemicals are absorbed into women's skin, and this isn't enough to cause problems to the fetus ," Leddon says. As a conservative measure, avoid hair treatment during your first trimester - that's when your developing baby is the most susceptible. In general, also avoid dyes and other treatments with ammonia because their fumes may cause nausea . more...



Pregnancy Skin Problems : What Skin Care Ingredients

I get asked this question a lot by my patients, and hopefully this will be a helpful guideline to you. A and B are known to be safe during pregnancy. 3 common over-the-counter ingredients that are category C are salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, and hydroquinone, a skin-lightening agent. Category D and X are known to cause fetal abnormalities, so they are definite no-nos. It allows you to type in either the brands or the generic name of a medicine, and they will tell you whether it's safe to use during pregnancy. more...



Skin Care Ingredients To Avoid While Pregnant - Lulur Spa

What Skin Care Ingredients to Avoid While Pregnant and Breastfeeding. Many people are still not that familiar with the cosmetic and skin care ingredients to avoid while pregnant or breastfeeding largely because the list is still growing and more studies are being done with newer ingredients and procedures. I’m very conservative in my thinking where pregnancy and skin care products and treatments are concerned but I don’t exactly agree with everything on the list and some things that are thought acceptable, I question. If you have used skin care ingredients to avoid while pregnant, please discontinue and don’t loose any sleep over it. It’s not an ingredient but a drug and is used for treating acne. The retinoids are synthetic derivatives and is on all doctors list not allowed. Some books say it’s safe and some say it isn’t, not enough known on the acids yet, I believe it’s safe but ask your doctor. Some believe it’s safe and some don’t. Used during facials, but not while pregnant. Remember being good to yourself is the most important thing you can do for you and your baby! more...



A List of Skin Care Ingredients That Shouldn't Be Used

Although a woman may not have reactions to ingredients in skin-care products prior to being pregnant, she needs to consider all the potentially harmful ingredients in the products during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Read the labels carefully to avoid skin-care ingredients that shouldn't be used while breastfeeding or when pregnant. Petroleum Products May Irritate Baby. A breastfeeding mother should avoid petroleum-based ingredients, because they can irritate sensitive baby skin. Formaldehyde can cause serious allergies and allergic reactions in the breastfeeding baby. Some technical names used to indicate the presence of formaldehyde include hydroxymethylglycinate, DMDM-hydantoin and methenesmine. more...



Safe skincare for pregnant women - body + soul

Since some skincare ingredients can penetrate the skin and enter the bloodstream (which, of course, developing bub also shares). Many women choose to have as natural a skincare regimen as possible when they are pregnant and breastfeeding. That sounds like a prison sentence to me, but in the interests of research, I decide to do the first three months in the skincare slammer – as chemical-free as possible – and then maybe I'll get a pass out for good behaviour. And I discover Aeos, a new skincare line from the UK. To add insult to injury, I'm getting dreaded dark spots, known as melasma (or the mask of pregnancy) from the sun and I don't know if it's the hormones or the products, but I also have breakouts. She also recommends the super serum Aspect Exfol l 15 ($79.20 1800 648 851), which uses lactic acid, which is safe for pregnancy, to reduce breakouts and pigmentation. As I lie tummy-down for the first time in months on a special pregnancy bean-bag, two therapists work in tandem to knead out my knots and, at the end of a blissful hour, I float out the door. I finally have that pregnancy glow and for once, it's not thanks to skincare. There's no evidence to show that the chemicals will harm your baby. They chemicals used, such as formaldehyde and acetone, are in such low doses that they will not harm your baby. more...



10 Beauty Products You Must Ditch During Pregnancy

It is a thrilling, suspense-ridden process with no certain answers - with a high probability that you will have created the greatest treasure of your life. The high-end products used more exotic ingredients, frequently including chemicals that can cause allergies, even roaming into riskier territory such as cancer-causing ingredients. If you are just having your nails done once every couple of weeks, is that a "safe dose?" The fact is, no one knows. Nicer Nails: Even if your friends know you for having the most flamboyant painted nails, wear naked nails with pride when you are pregnant. Image: The Female View. The Food and Drug Administration has approved Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) for use in chemical tanning. It has been shown not to absorb into the living skin below the dead layer, and is therefore considered safer than suntanning - which is known to cause cancer. However, these approvals do not take into account the risks of inhaling the particles of spray that get into the air during "tanning". Skin lightening products contain chemicals that interfere with enzymatic processes that lead to production of melanin, which darkens the skin. Unfortunately, pregnancy often induces darkening of the skin, and can lead to a pigment "mask" on the face, making the urge to action stronger. The active ingredient in hair removal products is usually some form of thioglycolic acid. There are no studies showing that this chemical is unsafe on the skin during pregnancy. The EU limits the ingredient to a maximum of 5% (as thioglycolic acid) in depilatories (hair removal products). The thioglycolic acid reacts chemically with disulfide bonds in hair. Because these ingredients are aggressive enough to react chemically, and no studies have been done to detect potential reprotoxic effects, we recommend the precautionary principle: Leave these on the shelf until after the pregnancy. more...



Ingredients to Avoid While You’re Pregnant or Breastfeeding

I caution everybody to read labels and be careful of what products and ingredients they’re putting on their skin, but when it comes to women who are pregnant, wanting to get pregnant, or breastfeeding, the warning goes up into the red zone. To protect yourself and your unborn or breastfeeding child, avoid any products with the following ingredients. I’ve already put up a list of 24 ingredients to avoid for anyone who’s concerned about reducing their toxic exposure and their risk of health problems. Derivatives of vitamin A have long been used in skin care products because of their ability to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Doctors advise women, however, to be on the cautious side, and avoid ingredients like retin-A, retinoic acid, retinol, retinyl linoleate, retinyl palmitate, Renova, Differin (adapelene), and Tazorac and avage (tazarotene). It’s great for reducing acne outbreaks, but the chemical can bore deep into the skin, and high doses of the oral form have shown to lead to pregnancy complications. The strongest concern is related to face and body peels that contain the ingredient, as these treatments increase absorption. Most doctors will advise caution, suggest you avoid these types of peels, and reduce or avoid salicylic acid in toners and moisturizers. (Also watch for beta hydroxy acid and BHA.) If you struggle with acne, ask your obstetrician how to safely treat it, and make sure your skin care products are non-clogging. Some doctors feel these are safe, and some are extra cautious. If you’ve been using one of these ingredients and didn’t realize the potential health hazards, it’s okay. The best approach to protect the health of your baby is to try to reduce your toxic exposure to chemicals in every way that you can, through your food, personal care items, and environment. more...



While Pregnant Avoid These Skin Care Ingredients

Below you will find a list of ingredients found in common skin care products that you will need to avoid during pregnancy. The first thing you need to watch for when looking at skin care products are Retinoids. The following are ingredients containing retinoids that you should watch for on skin care product labels: Retinyl Linoleate, Differin, Tazorac, Avage, Retinyl Palmitate, Retinol, Retin-A, Retinoic Acid and Renova. However, this doesn’t mean you should go out and start taking acne medications or using acne creams as many of the active ingredients in these medications can be harmful to your baby. Now, while it seems that you may not be able to use any skin care products during pregnancy, there are actually some out there that contain safe ingredients. You can use skin care products that include have the following ingredients: Glycolic Acid, Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs) or Lactic Acid as all of these are safe to use during pregnancy or while nursing. more...



Skin Care ingredients to avoid during Pregnancy

It's important to shelf the beta hydroxy acid (BHA) while pregnant or breastfeeding. Found in many topical exfoliants, cleansers and toners, this popular acid is mainly used to treat problem skin with acne. The biggest concern is when the skin is exposed to the acid in a peel. The saturation means more product is used, meaning more is absorbed into the skin and into the bloodstream. Essential oils are sometimes considered one of the most effective “natural” defenses against acne, amongst other treatable skin conditions. Topical use of specific essential oils work very well against the bacteria that cause pimples to form and decongesting the pores -  getting rid of congestion that causes acne. Improper use can lead to nausea, headaches, even burning the skin. To execute safe, effective treatments during pregnancy it is important understand the proper dilutions of essential oils. Tea tree, lavender and lemongrass essential oils are all antibacterial solutions to help rid the skin of acne and/or inflammation, however caution must be taken. Lavendar is one of the safest essential oils to use, as it’s calming and rids the skin of irritations; it speeds up healing and is regularly used to treat wounds, burns and acne lesions. Lactic Acid, Glycolic Acid and other alpha-hydroxy acids (AHA's) are safe to use during pregnancy, and will help keep the skin smooth and hydrated, refining your pores. Benzoyl peroxide is a topical solution compound that has been given the green light by physicians and OBs for many years to treat acne during pregnancy. Benzoyl Peroxide of a small percentage (2.5% - 5%) is absorbed into the skin. more...



Ingredients To Avoid During Pregnancy - Natural Living for

Choosing safer beauty products is easier when you learn which ingredients are best to avoid during pregnancy. The ingredients below that are suggested to avoid during pregnancy are commonly found in a variety of beauty products and are known or are suspected of being able to make their way through the placenta into the fetus. Ingredients To Avoid During Pregnancy and Why. Look for the many companies that offer phathalate free products, avoid products with "fragrance" on the label and find one of the new phathalate free nail polishes. While we are on the subject of nail products toulenes is another ingredient used in these products you might want to avoid during pregnancy. There is the possibility the chemicals in these products can be absorbed into the skin making this something else that is best to avoid during pregnancy. I hesitate to include essential oils in a list of ingredients to avoid during pregnancy because there are some essential oils that are particularly useful for pregnancy skin care. According to Safe Fetus (a database that provides information on the safety of medications taken during pregnancy and while breast feeding) benzoyl peroxide found in many products used to treat acne is rated a Category C meaning that: To avoid during pregnancy any concerns about lead in lipsticks by choosing from the many natural lipsticks available that will keep you looking pretty and feeling safe. If you are using products made by some of the major manufacturers this is probably true. The safety of ingredients used in our skin care products is being questioned and even less is known about the ability of these ingredients to make it through to the fetus or the effects they may have. You will find some of them listed on this page for pregnancy skin care . more...



10 Skin Care Ingredients To Avoid - Care2 Healthy Living

Many of us love to use essential oils in the air as aromatherapy and topically. Our skin is after all, the largest organ in our bodies and thus an important organ to care for as holistically as possible. Phrases like “Active Ingredients,” “Key Ingredients” and “Natural” are emblazoned across labels in bold print to distract us from investigating the small print of what is really in the product. These bright bottles with splashy labels are made with undesirable ingredients and futile fillers that our skin can certainly do without. Some ingredients and some products are better than others, so I have created a top ten list of commonly used ingredients that our skin, our cells, can thrive without! Mercury is not used in big amounts either and as a labeled bio-hazard, mercury devastates the cells. Look for sodium benzoate at the end of the ingredients list of skincare, toothpaste and mouth wash. The ingredients in the ingredients, like the preservatives in aloe, are called “secondary ingredients,” and they can be, and usually are, allowed to be left off the label. Aloe vera is wonderful for the skin, and fortunately aloe makes a great, easy to grow houseplant because that is the best source for pure aloe skin care. Simply break off a leaf and rub the pulp into skin. I like to mix my favorite serum with the aloe pulp in my palm and massage it into my skin before bed. Because aqueous solutions are vulnerable to spoilage, preservatives (like paraben, sodium benzoate and Leucidal Liquid) must be added to the product. Everything that is applied to the skin is absorbed in to the bloodstream, circulates to our cells and mingles with our mitochondria. When applying the right things, we can literally feed our immune system and skin cells. more...



Pregnant Skin : Ingredients to Avoid †skin1.info

For a major blemish, your dermatologist can also administer a cortisone shot, since the injection stays on site. Rapid changes in hormones during pregnancy can make the complexion more susceptible to hyperpigmentation, so the best thing to do, according to Peredo, is to focus your attention on prevention. “A sunblock with physical ingredients like zinc and titanium dioxide can keep dark spots from developing in the first place,” Peredo says. Once baby arrives, and after breastfeeding, your hormones will stabilize and hyperpigmentation may even improve on its own. “If not, you can always be more aggressive with chemical peels and prescription strength lighteners after pregnancy,” Peredo says. MORE: Pregnancy and Your Skin. While not recommended during pregnancy (“These are medical devices, and you don’t want to take that chance,” Fusco says), laser treatments can improve a host of pregnancy-related skin flaws after baby has arrived. Fraxel, for example, can effectively diminish the appearance of stretchmarks, “But only when they are still pinkish or purplish in color,” Fusco says. MORE: The Scoop on Peeling and Lasering. Skin tags, the tiny, fleshy growths that commonly sprout all over the body during pregnancy, can be quickly snipped off or removed with laser surgery. And visible veins in the legs that develop from increased blood flow during pregnancy can also be dissolved with sclerotherapy, in which a solution is injected into the area to break up the vessels. more...



Safe skin care during pregnancy

Most pregnant women know that what they put (or don't put) in their bodies is important to the well-being of their growing baby, whether it's the right kind of protein, too much caffeine, or certain types of fish. Most of us slather on oceans of lotions every day, but we don't think about what might be passing the skin barrier and being absorbed into our bodies. The more powerful and targeted products get, the more we need to be careful about what we have in our skin-care regimens during pregnancy. more...



12 Cosmetic Ingredients to Avoid During Pregnancy

Beta hydroxy acids: Salicylic acid, 3-hydroxypropionic acid, trethocanic acid and tropic acid. Diethanolamine (DEA): Found in hair and body products; stay clear of diethanolamine, oleamide DEA, lauramide DEA and cocamide DEA. Formaldehyde: Found in hair straightening treatments, nail polishes and eyelash glue; look for formaldehyde, quaternium-15, dimethyl-dimethyl (DMDM), hydantoin, imidazolidinyl urea, diazolidinyl urea, sodium hydroxymethylglycinate, and 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol (bromopol). Phthalates: Found in products with synthetic fragrances and nail polishes; avoid diethyl and dibutyl especially. Retinol: Vitamin A, retinoic acid, retinyl palmitate, retinaldehyde, adapalene, tretinoin, tazarotene and isotretinoin. Thioglycolic acid: Found in chemical hair removers; can also be labeled acetyl mercaptan, mercaptoacetate, mercaptoacetic acid and thiovanic acid. more...



Safety of skin care products during pregnancy

The role of the topical retinoids in these cases remains controversial, 15 – 18 as 2 prospective studies that examined use during the first trimester of pregnancy with 96 and 106 women did not find an increased risk of major malformations or evidence of retinoid embryopathy. 19 , 20 However, until data on larger cohorts are collected, women should not be encouraged to use topical retinoids during pregnancy. 2 , 3 No studies on the use of this preparation in pregnant patients have been published; however, systemic effects on a pregnant woman and her child would not be expected and therefore use of this product during pregnancy would not be of concern. 26 No studies have been conducted in pregnancy on topical use; however, as such a relatively small proportion is absorbed through the skin, it is unlikely to pose any risk to a developing baby. 27 Studies examining the use of glycolic acid in human pregnancy have not been conducted; however, using topical glycolic acid during pregnancy should not be of concern, as only a minimal amount is expected to be absorbed systemically. 9 A single study has been published involving the use of hydroquinone during pregnancy with no increase in adverse events; however, the sample size of pregnant women was small. These products contain dihydroxyacetone in concentrations ranging from 1% to 15%, and when applied topically, systemic levels are minimal (0.5%) 12 ; therefore, use during pregnancy would not be of concern. When addressing issues of hair removal, or reducing the appearance of hair, various topical agents are available, such as depilatory and hair-bleaching creams. In addition, although they might permeate the skin, the systemic absorption of these ions is minimal and therefore they do not increase serum levels and would not be considered a problem for use during pregnancy. Apart from hydroquinone (which is absorbed systemically in fairly substantial amounts and should be used very sparingly) and topical retinoids (owing to the troubling case reports), skin care products are not expected to increase the risk of malformations or other adverse effects on the developing fetus. more...



Pregnancy - Safe Skin Care : The Best Products and Ingredients

Pregnancy-Safe Skin Care: The Best Products & Ingredients to Use. Your skin care routine is one of those adjustments, but it’s so confusing to know which ingredients are safe and which ones aren’t. That’s where I come in, I know from experience, what ingredients are beneficial for your skin, which ones are a big NO, and the different products and brands to help make your pregnancy a little less stressful! Make a list of your beauty and skin care products and review them with your ob-gyn and dermatologist. Read ALL of the ingredients labels for all of your products. I often inform my clients that if they want to get a facial while pregnant make sure the esthetician is well aware, ask what products they are going to use, and when in doubt – bring your own pregnancy safe products and ask your esthetician to use those instead. Remember it’s temporary and there are a lot of natural choices to get your skin back in balance. The ingredients in this product should be safe for use during pregnancy, though I do always urge you to check with your doctor for approval. Are they okay with their Vitamin A ingredients and Salysic Acid (in the face wash) to use during pregnancy? Generally speaking, yes, Eminence Organic’s Clear Skin Probiotic Moisturizer and Face Wash, Clear Skin and 8 Greens Serum should be okay for use during pregnancy. more...



Beauty Products to Avoid During Pregnancy, Causes, Tests

Beauty Products to Avoid During Pregnancy. Try tweaking your beauty regimen during pregnancy for the health of your baby. Certain products and treatments are best left behind for the nine months, or at least the first three. During pregnancy, you can expect your hair to look fuller and lush, and of course, your skin will have that gorgeous, mother-to-be glow. Acne breakouts, stretch marks and dark patches are some of the most common pregnancy-related skin conditions . Since ingredients in some products for the skin or scalp can penetrate and find their way into your bloodstream, it is worth being extra cautious during these important months. Retin A: Topical Retin A and retinol (found in many anti-aging lotions) are derived from vitamin A, and this ingredient is not recommended for use during pregnancy. Out of caution, this ingredient should be avoided during pregnancy, and especially so when there is soaking involved such as in face and body peels. Some experts have recommended soy-based products instead, but if you can wait until after this special time for you and your baby, there are many more options for skin lightening, and more. Parabens: This ingredient is a commonly used as a preservative in makeup, moisturizers and hair products. Luckily for those who disagree, more and more cosmetic brands are reformulating products to be paraben-free. Sunscreen: Sun protection is essential for everyone, and during pregnancy, it’s your best bet for helping to prevent, or at least minimize, the appearance of dark patches. Likewise, hot tubs are often set pretty high, and soaking in one can cause the body to overheat, so this should be avoided. If you have any questions or concerns, your doctor can also help you safely navigate the dos and don’ts of expectant motherhood. “Dying for a Change: Hair Color and Your Pregnancy.” http:/www.pregnancy.org/article/dying-change-hair-color-and-your-pregnancy. more...



8 Pregnancy - Friendly Skincare Lines

However, there are some skin care ingredients that should be avoided during pregnancy , and you should make  skincare routine adjustments for pregnancy . As a beauty blogger and a pediatrician in my “real” life, I get a lot of questions from readers about what skincare to use during pregnancy. Sleep is a precious commodity during pregnancy, and you shouldn’t be losing it over your choice of facial cleanser! I've pulled together a list of pregnancy friendly skincare lines using my  criteria for pregnancy safe skincare . Check here for a list of pregnancy safe skin care products from regular skincare lines. Get Belli Skincare here. Mama Mio has created a group of products designed to help your body bounce back during pregnancy and after delivery. But it is their pregnancy facial products that should really be in the spotlight. This line was developed by an Obstetrician for use during pregnancy and features stretch mark creams and acne treatments. Pretty Mommies was started by a real mom who was frustrated with the lack of products on the market to treat her skin during pregnancy and nursing. Get Pretty Mommies here. These skincare products are vegan and mostly organic, relying on plant extracts for their active ingredients. Get Novena Maternity here. I used the Belly Butter throughout my pregnancy, and I still reach for it to help soothe my eczema flares. Get Mustela here. more...



Pregnancy Skin Care Tips and Products - Paula's Choice

Because some ingredients—both from prescription drugs and from some skin-care products—are absorbed into the body when applied to skin, you need to know what's safe for use during pregnancy and what to avoid. Although it is always important for you to check with your own physician, as a general rule, most skin-care products such as cleansers, toners, moisturizers, eye creams, scrubs, and lip balms that do not contain over-the-counter ingredients regulated by the FDA are fine for use throughout your pregnancy. Prescription topical antibiotics, such as erythromycin and clindamycin are considered safe for use during pregnancy. It is a prescription only topical medication considered safe for use during pregnancy and has good research showing it can improve brown skin discolorations. Stretch marks that occur during or after pregnancy are caused by the skin becoming abnormally stretched and expanded for a period of time. Massaging your skin with a serum or non-fragrant plant oil while you are pregnant can help it become more pliable and reduce the potential of stretch marks. Metronidazole (the active ingredient in Metro Cream, Metro Gel, and Metro Lotion) is considered safe for use during pregnancy. It is safe for use during pregnancy. Although the information above isn't meant to be exhaustive, it should give you a clear idea of what's OK to use during pregnancy and what should be avoided. Most important, you can achieve your skin-care goals during pregnancy, and that's sure to put your mind at ease! With Paula’s Choice Skincare, you can get (and keep) the best skin of your life! more...



Safe skin care during pregnancy - BabyCenter Canada

The vast majority of these lotions and products are safe to use since they have low absorption rates. Avoid the use of oral retinoids during pregnancy. Whether salicylic acid is safe during pregnancy depends somewhat on how you use it, the p H balance, the strength, and the quantity you use (Bozzo, Chua-Gocheco, Einarson 2011). Use some caution and consult your midwife, doctor or a dermatologist to determine if the way you are using your product containing salicylic acid and the chemical makeup of it are safe for pregnancy. While soy-based lotions and facial products are generally safe to use, but may make common pregnancy skin changes like the mask of pregnancy (dark splotches on facial skin) worse. And as your mom always told you: Don't forget the sunscreen. Sunscreens, including those with ingredients that penetrate the skin, are considered safe. You can use titanium dioxide or zinc oxide as they are good sunscreens and do not penetrate your skin. These are safe and will not affect the health of your baby. These products use ingredients that primarily sit on top of the skin and don't cause irritation for most people. more...