Skin Care Companies That Don'T Test On Animals

Which Makeup Companies Do or Don't Test On Animals

We like to think of animal testing by makeup companies as a thing of the past. Unfortunately companies testing their products on animals is far from gone, and is hardly going to change any time soon. One of the reasons a lot of these companies are where they are on the list is that they have chosen to sell in China. You see, this is more than simply not using animals in the development of their products. In order for a company to be permitted to sell in China (the most populated country on the planet), their products must undergo animal testing per the government's rules. Companies that do test on animals: In 1989, Avon abandoned animal testing in favor of more humane practices, but they are one of the many who sold out to China for the opportunity to sell there. However, like many companies you'd be surprised are, it is a subsidiary of the Estee Lauder Companies, which all sell in China and test on animals. (And what we have to remember is that it's not just rabbits. Almost all animals are at risk for animal testing, even cats and dogs.) Estee Lauder is probably the biggest cosmetics brand to be doing what they are. Is considered one of the most high-end companies right now. It's important to note that this isn't every product in Sephora stores—it applies to only the Sephora brand. Technically they are, but the third party companies that provide the ingredients for their products are not. I feel like not many of us are all that surprised that a name as big as Victoria's Secret tests their products on animals. more...



Animal Testing Report Card : Paula's Choice Skincare

The brands below are grouped in one of the following categories: Brands That DO NOT Test on Animals, Brands That DO Test on Animals, and *Brands Whose Animal Testing Status is Unknown. IMPORTANT NOTE 1: If the company's site claims they do not test on animals but the brand is sold in mainland China from a physical location (i.e. IMPORTANT NOTE 2: If a brand is available only online, with no physical storefronts or warehousing in mainland China, they are exempt from the Chinese government's animal testing requirements. IMPORTANT NOTE 3: If an individual brand doesn't test on animals, but their parent company does test on animals, we do not penalize the individual brand. more...



Ethical Skincare - The Good Shopping Guide

Even though the big cosmetics firms love to use the word ‘natural’ on their products, most skincare creams use man-made chemicals, some of which are potentially toxic. See the findings behind companies’ ethical ratings, as featured in The Good Shopping Guide. Fragrance-free skincare creams, and those which are made from certified natural ingredients, are less likely to irritate the skin. According to Friends of the Earth, our bodies are on average contaminated with 300 man-made chemicals. Many of these chemicals ‘bio-accumulate’, meaning that they aren’t broken down by the body. Some can also interfere with the hormone system and may cause cancer. The longterm effects of these chemicals are so far unknown and, more worryingly, even if they were found to be harmful, our bodies would be unable to eliminate them. Friends of the Earth believes that these chemicals should be identified, then phased out and replaced with safer alternatives as soon as possible. However, that doesn’t mean that companies selling their products in Europe do not continue to test products (or ingredients) on animals outside Europe and continue to sell them in other markets. The only way to be completely sure you aren’t indirectly supporting animal tests is to purchase products from companies that don’t do any animal testing – look for Cruelty-Free International’s Leaping Bunny symbol, which guarantees that the company in question does not test on animals anywhere in the world. PETA also has a searchable database of companies that do and do not test their products on animals. Some brands such as L’Occitane and Weleda use glass and aluminum, which can be easily recycled to package some of their ethical skincare products. The Body Shop used to refill old bottles, although these days not every shop offers this facility (and we have concerns over their parent company since the takeover!). The Good Shopping Guide reveals the good, the bad, and the ugly of the world’s companies and brands, assisting you in choosing more eco-friendly, ethical products that support the growth of social responsibility and ethical business as well as a more sustainable, just society. more...



PETA Prime : Top Six Cruelty - Free Anti - Aging Creams

It’s available at Whole Foods and online at Alba Botanica.com . It’s available at health-food stores and select supermarkets as well as online at JASON-Natural.elsstore.com . Why we love it: “I like it because it’s fragrance-free, gentle on the skin, and not greasy. It’s available at The Body Shop stores and online at The Body Shop.com . It’s available at Whole Foods, many drug stores, and online at Avalon Organics.com . It’s available at GNC, Whole Foods, some Trader Joe’s stores, and online at Alba Botonica.com . The smell is nice and not overwhelming like some moisture creams are. Available at most drug stores, such as Walgreens and Rite Aide, and online at OPotion.com . Available at health-food stores and online at Alba Botanica.com . Available at Kmart, various other stores, and online at No-ad.com . more...



Cruelty Free Cosmetics – The Best Brands that Don’t Test

If you do bite your nails over the sacrifices our furry friends sometimes have to make for the sake of human beauty, you already know: it can be tough to find cruelty-free products that do a good job and don’t break the bank (especially makeup). We’re all about making your skincare-related lives easier, so we’ve done the research for you. This week, we’re giving you the dirt on e.l.f. The merchandise is widely available and absurdly affordable: you can pick most items up at your neighborhood drug store or Target for under $5. Even better, most products are of shockingly good quality for the price. We’re big fans of the e.l.f. If you’re looking for more earth-friendly features than just kindness to animals, you may have found your brand – and if you’re not, you can still benefit from Alba’s devotion to organic plants, because it means that everything the company makes smells amazing. With  powerful pineapple enzyme working to eat away the dirt in your pores, but no harsh chemical cleansers, this product is a godsend especially for oily and sensitive skin. more...



Cosmetic Lines That Don't Test Products on Animals

These days, more cosmetic companies are opting to say no to the harmful effects of unnecessary animal testing experiments. According to Britannica biomedical sciences editor, Kara Rogers, the results of toxicity testing on animals have been more inadequate than not. According to its website, Almay has not conducted animal testing for more than 20 years. Instead, the brand uses advanced technologies to ensure the safety of its makeup and toxicity testing practices. Not only does Aveda adopt non-animal testing practices, but its parent company, Estée Lauder Companies Inc., actively seeks to fund scientific alternatives to toxicity testing on animals across the beauty industry. The formulas found in this cosmetic line are not tested on animals, plus the company ensures that even its manufacturers adopt cruelty-free testing practices. Created as a cruelty-free brand from the start, Urban Decay takes its anti-animal testing stance a step further, offering consumers some options that do not contain any animal-derived ingredients. more...



Animal testing labelling - skin care and cosmetics

Beltran alleged that Avon had been participating in deceptive and misleading conduct by falsely promoting its products as "cruelty free" and not tested on animals "when in fact the defendant was testing its cosmetic products on animals so that it could sell its products in China". And at the moment, these tests are done on animals." And regardless of the pre-market testing requirements, Chinese authorities still carry out post-market testing of all products on Chinese shelves, so any product sold in China (and any company that sells its products in the Chinese market) is tainted by animal testing . Products that have the potential to cause harm to humans, including personal-care products, cosmetics and medication, must undergo testing to ensure they're safe to use. Animal testing is not reliable, and it is not humane to treat animals this way." Many consumers are strongly opposed to animal testing and CHOICE believes information should be available so those who want to choose products that aren't tested on animals can do so. Companies selling cosmetics in China knowingly provide samples for animal testing, and open their products up to being tested on animals in post-market testing too. L'Occitane also talks up  its fight against animal testing, but then admits: "The company's products are sold globally and, along with many other global businesses, China is an essential market for its development. At Benefit and Bobbi Brown, our shopper was told the products weren't tested on animals, but upon probing further was referred to the head office for more information. Estée Lauder, the parent company of several of the brands now sold in China including Bobbi Brown and Smashbox, states on its website: "Our longstanding commitment to end animal testing has not changed: we do not test our products or ingredients on animals, nor do we ask others to test on our behalf, except where required by law." According to Giorgio Armani's website ,"Giorgio Armani does not use animals to test its products, and does not have animal testing conducted on its behalf by anyone else." The brand is in the Chinese market and is on PETA's list of companies that do test on animals. Cosmetics packaging and animal testing. The claims on the products varied, from the seemingly unequivocal "products and ingredients not tested on animals", "never tested on animals", and "cruelty-free vegan", to the slightly more ambiguous "not tested on animals" and "cruelty-free", and the potentially questionable "against animal testing", "finished product not tested on animals" and "tested on us". Only the Nature's Organics , Trishave and Innoxa products were certified by a third party, Choose Cruelty Free, as not tested on animals. There are several independent third parties that certify products as having not been tested on animals, including Choose Cruelty Free , the Leaping Bunny , and PETA . more...



Common Companies That DO and DO not Test on Animals

Frequently Asked Questions Why are these companies included on the 'Do Test' list? For a complete listing of products manufactured by acompany on this list, please visit the company's Web site or contact the company directly for moreinformation. Companies on this list may manufacture individual lines of products without animal testing(e.g., Clairol claims that its Herbal Essences line is not animal-tested). They have not, however, eliminatedanimal testing from their entire line of cosmetics and household products. Similarly, companies on this list may make some products, such as pharmaceuticals, that are required by law to be tested on animals. However, the reason for these companies' inclusion on the list is not theanimal testing that they conduct that is required by law, but rather the animal testing (of personal-careand household products) that is. (Aussie, Daily Defense, Herbal Essences, Infusium 23, Procter & Gamble), 1 Blachley Rd., Stamford, CT 06922; 800-252-4765;    www.clairol.com   (Procter & Gamble), 1 Procter & Gamble Plz., Cincinnati, OH 45202; 513-983-1100; 800-543-1745;    www.maxfactor.com   (Procter & Gamble), P. Box 599, Cincinnati, OH 45201; 800-543-1745;    www.oilofolay.com   (Procter & Gamble), 1 Procter & Gamble Plz., Cincinnati, OH 45202; 800-945-7768;  www.pantene.com   (Procter & Gamble), 1 Procter & Gamble Plz., Cincinnati, OH 45202; 800-214-8957;  www.physique.com   Procter & Gamble Co. 1 Procter &Gamble Plz., Cincinnati, OH 45202; 513-983-1100; 800-543-1745;    www.pg.com   more...



Cosmetic products not tested on animals - MNN

We've got the details on five brands offering cruelty-free cosmetics and personal care products that are safe, natural, healthy and widely available. Decades after modern animal testing practices began, many companies began turning to more humane methods, and offering products not tested on animals. These five brands offer cruelty-free cosmetics and personal care products that are safe, natural, healthy and widely available, making it easy to avoid makeup that's tested on animals. Burt's Bees products are not only entirely free of petrochemicals, sulfates, parabens and phthalates but are never tested on animals. Everyday Minerals creates cosmetics that are organic, vegan, eco-friendly and never tested on animals. None of the products produced by Kiss My Face are tested on animals, and many are vegan. Kiss My Face, which began on an organic farm in New York, supports the Corporate Standard of Compassion for Animals (also known as the Leaping Bunny Organization ), and is committed to creating environmentally responsible products that are safe, natural and effective. Among the cosmetics not tested on animals offered by Kiss My Face are tinted moisturizers, organic shimmers and shines, lip balm and cheek color. Though now owned by L'Oreal, a company that does test on animals, The Body Shop maintains that its strict standards against animal testing have not been compromised. L'Oreal — which owns such brands as Garnier, Maybelline and Lancome — claims that it no longer tests finished products on animals and has recently funded technology that could reduce the need for animal testing in the future, but is not cruelty-free. more...



Which companies and brands still allow testing on animals

The good news is that finding out which products and brands don't test on animals is easy. Some tests are standard practice for such companies and brands, and other animal tests are carried out because of local laws in importing countries (such as China) that require all beauty products to be tested on animals before they are allowed to be sold in that country. The list below shows companies that use animal testing as well as particular brands that are tested on animals for any or all of the reasons we mention above: more...



Beauty Without Bunnies

What types of companies are on the "Don't Test" list? The list includes companies that make cosmetics, personal-care products, household-cleaning products, and other common household products. S., no law requires that these types of products be tested on animals, and companies can choose not to sell their products in countries such as China, where tests on animals are required for cosmetics and other products. The list does not include companies that manufacture only products that are required by law to be tested on animals (e.g., pharmaceuticals and garden chemicals). All companies that are included on PETA’s cruelty-free list have signed PETA’s statement of assurance or submitted a statement verifying that neither they nor their ingredient suppliers conduct, commission, or pay for any tests on animals for ingredients, formulations, or finished products. A company that claims not to test on animals but that doesn’t appear on PETA’s list may have eliminated tests on animals for finished products but not for ingredients. If you communicate with a company that claims to be cruelty-free but is not on our list, please ask for a statement in writing and send a copy of the statement to PETA. Some companies are not educated about or sensitive to the suffering of animals in the production of certain products that do not involve the actual slaughter of animals. Please contact PETA if you have any questions about the status of companies that are listed or if you know the address of a company that is not listed. Why are these companies included on the "Do Test" list? The following companies manufacture products that are tested on animals at some stage of development. Companies on this list may manufacture individual lines of products that have not been tested on animals. more...



Animal Testing : Companies that DO not test on animals

Indicates that the company's products are strictly vegan (i.e., made without animal ingredients, such as milk and egg byproducts, slaughterhouse byproducts, sheep lanolin, honey, or beeswax). Indicates that the company's policies are in question. Also, to Sinead Hennigan, Carmen Paxton, and Adelaide from Canada for all their diligent help in helping check on the status of various companies on this list or the other one (the bad one). There are a lot of companies to keep track of and up with. more...



Cruelty - Free Shopping Guide - Animals Australia Unleashed

Luckily for you (and the animals) cruelty-free products are more abundant than ever. This is the “Not Tested on Animals” logo, that appears on some products that are not tested on animals (but not all). If you see this stamp on a product—you’re set, and can be sure that the brand stands up to the strict accreditation scheme of Choose Cruelty Free. Check out their website for an even bigger list of cosmetics and other products that aren’t tested on animals or download the free app ! Just look out for products that say “not tested on animals” or better yet, are marked with the Choose Cruelty Free stamp of approval. And of course, if they do test on animals, it’s always worth politely explaining that you don’t support animal tests and won’t be buying their products! more...



List of Cruelty Free Brands - Home - My Beauty Bunny

We all want to buy cruelty-free beauty products , but many times the problem is that we don’t have time to do research on brands before buying. We hope this cruelty free list will help you find brands and products that have not been tested on animals. One issue with finding truly cruelty-free beauty brands is that brands can call themselves “cruelty-free” if they do not test their finished products on animals, but they can still buy ingredients from suppliers who are conducting animal tests. So, buyer beware.) Leaping Bunny is the gold standard for cruelty free beauty products, but not all cruelty free products have registered with Leaping Bunny. We have done our best to include only companies that are completely cruelty-free, but it is impossible to know if brands are really purchasing ingredients from cruelty-free suppliers, or if the suppliers are being up-front with the brands. This is not an exhaustive list of cruelty-free beauty and household goods brands – you can check PETA and Leaping Bunny for the latest. more...



The Easy Way to Go Cruelty - Free - PETA UK

This list is all you need, but if you want to know more about the list and who’s on it and why, read on. The testing of cosmetics and toiletry products on animals has long been banned in the UK, and as of March 2013, the sale of cosmetics whose ingredients have been tested on animals has also been banned across the European Union – a huge step forward. In some countries – China, for example – it is compulsory for any company that sells cosmetics to pay for the products to be tested on animals. This means that some companies that have been cruelty-free for years have turned their backs on their ethical policies and have started testing on animals in order to reach these lucrative developing markets. Companies may be complying with the cosmetics testing ban in Europe, but at the same time, they are selling products in another market that have been tested on animals. By buying cosmetics from companies that are on PETA US’ list , you can be confident that you are supporting only companies that don’t test any products anywhere in the world for any market. Another concern is that companies may be testing ingredients for other purposes – for example, testing chemicals under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulation. Companies with a real commitment to stopping animal testing go above and beyond the requirements of the law and don’t test any ingredients on animals. For its cruelty-free list, PETA US approves only companies that have the very best policies against animal testing – companies whose policies make a real difference helping to stamp out animal testing. New companies are added to the cruelty-free list all the time. Beware of claims such as “this product is not tested on animals”, which can hide the fact that its ingredients are tested on animals, and “this company does not test on animals”, which may simply mean the company contracts out its testing to other companies. That’s why it’s so important that caring consumers use their purchasing power to support companies that have strong, progressive policies which ban animal testing now and which will continue to prevent it in the future. Of course, other companies may produce products which are entirely free of animal ingredients, and you can find out which ones by checking the labels before buying any product. Thousands of animals suffer and are killed for cosmetics testing around the world every year – and billions are also killed for food. more...



Don't Support Skin Care Products Tested On Animals

These animals are tested on to determine the safety of skin care products for public use. The FDA (the Food and Drug Administration) doesn't require animal testing for skin care products, so why bother going through with torturing defenseless animals? Who knows the reason why, but what I do know is that there are big, BIG name companies that do not test on animals, and actually frown upon animal testing entirely. Companies test their products on animals to determine the level of skin irritancy, tissue damage to the eyes, and toxicity of a product they are looking to market. When animals are tested on, the results are unfortunately not entirely accurate. The results are just too inconclusive to keep on considering animals testing as the norm for cosmetics. There are methods of testing that keep the animals, the consumers, and the environment happy. Even though the FDA doesn't require animal testing for skin care products, and even though the European Union banned animal testing starting in early 2009, and is going as far as banning any and all products that are tested on animals in 2013, many companies still test on animals in the US. If the product is tested on animals, and it's toxic to animals, wouldn't common sense dictate that it would maybe in some way be toxic to humans? more...



Big - name beauty brands dropping cruelty - free animal

Big-name beauty brands dropping cruelty-free animal testing policies to sell their products to China. L'Occitane and Yves Rocher: The big-name beauty brands among those ditching cruelty-free animal testing policies to sell their products to China  L'Occitane, Yves Rocher and Caudalie are among the high end brands that can no longer use the internationally-recognised official Leaping Bunny logo to show their cosmetics are free from animal testing. It comes after the firms decided to start selling to China where animal testing on beauty products for human use is still required by law. But many companies selling their products in the country have been asked to fund animal testing of their products in Chinese laboratories in order for them to be sold to the public. 'We certify over 400 companies around the world that refuse to allow animal testing into their products, so there is plenty of choice for everyone who wishes to eliminate this cruel, unnecessary and outdated practice. 'The only way that you can avoid animal testing in your toiletries and beauty products is by looking for the Leaping Bunny logo, or checking www. Britain banned animal testing in 1998 and several large cosmetics companies including Paul Mitchell, Sainbury's, The Co-operative, Superdrug, Marks & Spencer all have Leaping Bunny certification meaning they are cruelty-free. 'We do not conduct or condone animal testing on our products, and we will not attempt to market our products in China until alternatives to animal testing methods have been accepted by the government. Even more surprisingly, there are many huge international brands including Chanel, Yves Saint Laurent and Revlon, which have never been able to use the Leaping Bunny logo because of their animal testing policies. 'We do sell our products in China however and the Chinese government reserves the right to conduct tests, but we are hopeful that this situation will change soon. more...



Leaping Bunny Approved Brands - Leaping Bunny

The only preservatives that we use are natural and extracted from plants. A full range of natural, 100% vegetarian personal care products that are packed with natural, botanical ingredients to do beautiful for you, your friends and the animals and Earth you love. Every product is made with care and love in small batches from ingredients that have been thoroughly researched to ensure quality products that are safe for you, your family and the planet. Our Products are an essential part of your bath and body experience. Established in 1988, with the aim of developing a completely natural range of skin care products that are free of artificial additives and are environmentally friendly. Discover the skin you've been waiting for with our 100% clean, nutrient-rich and gluten-free skincare products. Our products are organic and natural, however, we use these ingredients in sufficient quantity and in the correct combination that work effectively. All products are 100% natural and designed for girls and women of all ages and skin types. We want to tell people that we care for their skin and that we work hard with nature to create one of best products in the market. We are committed to researching and using organic natural ingredients in our products all. Our products use ingredients that are safe, conscious, and incredibly effective. Our all natural skin and hair care products are manufactured using sustainable and eco-friendly methods from production to testing to packaging. With no suitable alternatives to turn to, we made it our mission to find the safest and most effective ingredients for our products. Environmental Sustainability: All of our products are bio-degradable and will never harm your skin nor the environment. All of our products are SLS and Paraben-free. more...



Cruelty - Free Cosmetics : The Best Brands That Don't Test on

It can be tough to find skincare and beauty products that have been proven safe and effective –but not by animal testing. Hauschka, you’ll find both “decorative cosmetics”, made from botanicals and natural minerals, and a skincare line based on homeopathy, or the philosophy that like cures like. Your skin and oil glands are built to sense the oil levels already present and adjust oil production accordingly: if the skin is too oily, the glands can shut down production for a little while. The problem is that the skin can’t tell the difference between its own oil and products that have been applied — so a drying astringent may actually stimulate oil production. The same principle can apply to excessive moisturizer used on dry skin. Some people find this to be true for them and some don’t, but if you’ve been busting out bigger and bigger oil-controlling guns while your face just seems to get greasier and greasier (or vice versa), we highly suggest you give Hauschka’s high-quality and cruelty-free products a try. The company’s popular Almond Aloe Facial Moisturizer scores high marks from consumers for its light, nongreasy emollience — almond oil, vitamin E, and aloe offer nourishing moisture, minus the grease. Whatever the reason — cruelty-free makeup is much harder to find than cruelty-free skin care products. If you like to get creative with your face and you’re looking for makeup beyond the basic and natural-looking, your options are even fewer. more...



Search for Cruelty - Free Cosmetics : Makeup, Personal

What types of companies are on the "Don't Test" list? The list includes companies that make cosmetics, personal-care products, household-cleaning products, and other common household products. S., no law requires that these types of products be tested on animals, and companies can choose not to sell their products in countries such as China, where tests on animals are required for cosmetics and other products. The list does not include companies that manufacture only products that are required by law to be tested on animals (e.g., pharmaceuticals and garden chemicals). No specific laws exist regarding cruelty-free labeling of products, and companies may not have the same high standards as PETA when labeling their products. A company that claims not to test on animals but that doesn't appear on PETA's list may have eliminated tests on animals for finished products but not for ingredients. If you communicate with a company that claims to be cruelty-free but is not on our list, please ask for a statement in writing and send a copy of the statement to PETA. Why are these companies included on the "Do Test" list? The following companies manufacture products that are tested on animals at some stage of development. Companies on this list may manufacture individual lines of products that have not been tested on animals. more...



10 Hair Products That Don't Test on Animals

This is my all-time favorite hair treatment. Lush Big Shampoo – $26.95. The downside with most Lush shampoos is that they don’t lather well, but Big makes up for that by leaving your hair (and hands!) satiny smooth. This shampoo was designed specifically for oily hair, and it’ll leave you smelling like delicious ginger. This hairspray dries quickly, doesn’t leave build-up on your scalp, and doesn’t contribute to any animal deaths. The Balm En Root Dry Shampoo – $19. This dry shampoo is Paraben- and sulfate- and cruelty-free. I’ll admit that I chug the Lush Kool-Aid, but this product seriously lives up to the hype. Ambiance Volumizing Dry Shampoo – $15. This powder dry shampoo comes with an applicator, so you’ll finally get to imagine you’re using a shaving cream brush in an old-timey barbershop. This primer doesn’t have a strong smell and doesn’t weigh your hair down, and it does an A+ job of protecting your strands from heat styling damage. Made from renewable bamboo, you can buy this brush and know you’re not making the world worse. Animals, your hair, and Elle Woods will thank you. more...



Cruelty - free Beauty : It’s Easier Than You Think

But beauty comes at a price and I’m not talking about the damage to your purse. It’s no secret that most make-up brands have a history bloodied by animal testing. The organization has brought the plight of countless animals to the public’s attention and has made many brands re-evaluate their approach to ensuring the safety of their products. Some brands don’t test their products on animals and don’t use ingredients that have been tested on animals either, but they are owned by a company that tests other brands in their range on animals. The Body Shop built its reputation on its animal-friendly credo. If you knew one thing about The Body Shop it was that it was 100 percent free of animal testing. So while The Body Shop maintains its cruelty-free image, it’s no longer credible. Editor’s Note: We at My Beauty Bunny believe that although a cruelty-free brand owned by a non-cruelty-free corporation is not ideal, it DOES allow the cruelty-free products to reach a wider audience (often Target, Wal-Mart and drugstore channels). This is the line of thought followed by PETA, and we agree with it. There are, however, a rising number of brands and companies that fully endorse animal-friendly principles, even down to avoiding ingredients that contain any animal products, such as beeswax, lanolin and elastin. You can find out more about companies that do and don’t test on animals on PETA’s website . more...