What Face Products Not To Use While Pregnant

Skin Care During Pregnancy

Pregnant Women – What Skin Care Product Ingredients are Safe? Patients ask us about safe pregnancy skin care, and which ingredients they should avoid while pregnant and nursing, especially when it comes to pregnancy and acne. There are actually very few studies evaluating the safety during pregnancy of the active ingredients in many skin care products. What skin care product ingredients are safe in pregnancy? Most skin care ingredients in drugstore and dermatology non-prescription products are safe in pregnancy. For acne, which is one of the most common problems in pregnancy, the only truly safe and best skincare products to use during pregnancy are the glycolic acid or other AHA (alpha hydroxy acid) products and peels. What ingredients in skin care products or medications should you avoid in pregnancy? Please see the addendum for the FDA pregnancy risk categories: For example, IPL treatments (photorejuvenation or photofacials), are really just the application of light on the surface of the skin, and we have never seen any reports of pregnancy related problems. Other topical acne treatment options are topical erythromycin or clindamycin (both class B), or azelaic acid (class B) for the treatment of acne, rosacea, and hyperpigmentation during pregnancy. We recommend avoiding this medication for safe pregnancy skin care. This is an all-natural and a 100% safe option for pregnant and breast-feeding women. Glycolic peels are safe in pregnancy but may make melasma worse depending on the time of year of your pregnancy and how much time you spend outdoors. Studies in pregnant women show the medication causes no increased risk to the fetus during pregnancy. Studies are unavailable and animal studies have shown a risk to the fetus or are also lacking. more...



New Mommy Beauty : What Skin Care Ingredients to Avoid

It seems easy to imagine that if you are pregnant (or are trying to get pregnant) that you should probably start taking those prenatals and avoid the pregnancy no-no items like alcohol, tobacco, etc. The truth is that there are ingredients in your night cream and acne spot treatment that have not been proven safe for use during pregnancy, or even worse, have been linked to birth defects. Personally, I am going the conservative route and avoiding ingredients that have not been proven to be safe in pregnancy. Ellen Marmur, whose book Simple Skin Beauty I wrote about a few days ago, says "be on the safe side and ask your ob/gyn about anything that you think might be harmful." I also want to add that even if you've been reassured that something is safe, if it makes you uncomfortable, just avoid it. There are so many products on the market now, it should be easy to avoid an ingredient. While Retin A and over the counter retinoids are not as strongly linked to birth defects as Accutane, they are all the same class of drug and as such are on pretty much every MD's list of no-no ingredients. The retinoids are Vitamin A derivatives, and I've seen quite a few lists advising to avoid topical Vitamin A as well, so it's made my list. • All Hydroxy Acids: From citric acid to salicylic acid, pretty much all of the hydroxy acids either are not safe or simply don't have enough information to say "sure, go crazy and rub this all over you." So, the official word is that all of they hydroxy acids, alpha and beta, have pregnancy categories that recommend avoidance, with 1 exception. I've seen a few books that say Glycolic Acid is fine, and there are many physicians that tell this to their patients. Both are also considered safe for pregnancy and breast feeding. Much is the same for any Hyaluronic Acid that you apply to the surface of the skin. Be aware that if you're allergic to sulfa drugs you should avoid this ingredient, but I've seen it as the active ingredient in many "pregnancy safe" acne treatments and is probably fine. I also looked up each drug in the book Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation , which is even more complete. • Hydroquinone: While there is no data on Hydroquinone in humans, and no studies have found the levels achieved with topical use, hydroquinone is likely safe to use during nursing. more...



Safe skin care during pregnancy

While soy-based lotions and facial products are generally safe to use, "Soy can make the ' mask of pregnancy ' (dark splotches on facial skin) worse, as can oil of bergamot, which is in many organic products," she says. Soy has estrogenic effects, which can make those dark patches, also known as melasma or chloasma , worse, Baumann explains. "The 'active soy' found in some product lines is okay, however, because the estrogenic components have been taken out." If you have dark skin or melasma, avoid these products, or choose 'active soy' products instead. If you're dealing with pregnancy-induced acne, a dermatologist can likely give you a safe topical antibiotic, advises Baumann. But if you prefer to avoid yet another doctor appointment, Baumann recommends using a facial wash that contains no more than 2 percent salicylic acid (look for the percentage on the product label). more...



Beauty and Skin Care Tips for Pregnant Women

Pregnancy causes hormonal changes that affect the body and therefore the skin. Since there are other chemical ingredients found in everyday beauty products that can potentially harm the reproductive health of your child, opt for certified organic products shampoos, lotions, body washes and cosmetics. If you’re unsure about your products, consult your obstetrician about products that are safe to use during pregnancy. Skin Problems During and After Pregnancy. There are a few skin problems that can crop up during and after pregnancy because of hormonal and physical changes. Women of color are susceptible to skin discolorations due to excess melanin production and pregnancy produces hormones (more estrogen and progesterone) that stimulate the skin to make more melanocytes. Meanwhile you can use a concealer on the discolorations. You can also use a gentle skin brush or washcloth to massage the skin and increase blood flow to the area, which might help. Before the stretch marks have a chance to form, keep the skin moisturized by applying a natural emollient like cocoa butter to your stomach and breasts. During pregnancy the skin can become oilier. When using makeup opt for products that are noncomedogenic to avoid clogging the pores and causing breakouts. Avoid hot bathes and showers and use mild cleansers that will not further dry out skin. You can also get dry, itchy bellies from the stretching of the skin. more...



Safety of skin care products during pregnancy

The role of the topical retinoids in these cases remains controversial, 15 – 18 as 2 prospective studies that examined use during the first trimester of pregnancy with 96 and 106 women did not find an increased risk of major malformations or evidence of retinoid embryopathy. 19 , 20 However, until data on larger cohorts are collected, women should not be encouraged to use topical retinoids during pregnancy. 2 , 3 No studies on the use of this preparation in pregnant patients have been published; however, systemic effects on a pregnant woman and her child would not be expected and therefore use of this product during pregnancy would not be of concern. 26 No studies have been conducted in pregnancy on topical use; however, as such a relatively small proportion is absorbed through the skin, it is unlikely to pose any risk to a developing baby. 27 Studies examining the use of glycolic acid in human pregnancy have not been conducted; however, using topical glycolic acid during pregnancy should not be of concern, as only a minimal amount is expected to be absorbed systemically. 9 A single study has been published involving the use of hydroquinone during pregnancy with no increase in adverse events; however, the sample size of pregnant women was small. These products contain dihydroxyacetone in concentrations ranging from 1% to 15%, and when applied topically, systemic levels are minimal (0.5%) 12 ; therefore, use during pregnancy would not be of concern. When addressing issues of hair removal, or reducing the appearance of hair, various topical agents are available, such as depilatory and hair-bleaching creams. In addition, although they might permeate the skin, the systemic absorption of these ions is minimal and therefore they do not increase serum levels and would not be considered a problem for use during pregnancy. Apart from hydroquinone (which is absorbed systemically in fairly substantial amounts and should be used very sparingly) and topical retinoids (owing to the troubling case reports), skin care products are not expected to increase the risk of malformations or other adverse effects on the developing fetus. more...



Pregnancy Skin Care Tips and Products - Paula's Choice

Because some ingredients—both from prescription drugs and from some skin-care products—are absorbed into the body when applied to skin, you need to know what's safe for use during pregnancy and what to avoid. Although it is always important for you to check with your own physician, as a general rule, most skin-care products such as cleansers, toners, moisturizers, eye creams, scrubs, and lip balms that do not contain over-the-counter ingredients regulated by the FDA are fine for use throughout your pregnancy. Prescription topical antibiotics, such as erythromycin and clindamycin are considered safe for use during pregnancy. It is a prescription only topical medication considered safe for use during pregnancy and has good research showing it can improve brown skin discolorations. Stretch marks that occur during or after pregnancy are caused by the skin becoming abnormally stretched and expanded for a period of time. Massaging your skin with a serum or non-fragrant plant oil while you are pregnant can help it become more pliable and reduce the potential of stretch marks. Metronidazole (the active ingredient in Metro Cream, Metro Gel, and Metro Lotion) is considered safe for use during pregnancy. It is safe for use during pregnancy. Although the information above isn't meant to be exhaustive, it should give you a clear idea of what's OK to use during pregnancy and what should be avoided. Most important, you can achieve your skin-care goals during pregnancy, and that's sure to put your mind at ease! With Paula’s Choice Skincare, you can get (and keep) the best skin of your life! more...



Safe Beauty Products for Pregnant Women

Safe Beauty Products for Pregnant Women. While the majority of commonly used beauty products are perfectly safe, there are certain ingredients — especially in high-end or specialty products — that should be avoided. It’s best to avoid this chemical-filled shampoo during the first trimester, but talk with your doctor about a safe treatment for dandruff. Obviously you shouldn’t be tanning for real during pregnancy (or ever) for many reasons, but the good news is that the Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) in chemical tanning isn’t supposed to absorb past your top layer of skin. While it might be safe, the estrogen in soy can increase the dark facial splotches that pregnant women are prone to get. Look for lethicin, phosphatidylcholine, soy and textured vegetable protein (TVP) in the ingredients. And if you’re concerned, skip the polish during the first trimester or opt for a more natural polish free of tolune, DHB and formaldehyde — all of which are known to be carcinogenic. Again, talk with your doctor about the specific brand you’re thinking about using or just skip it for now. While it’s generally accepted that highlighting your hair (which is painted directly on the hair) is safer than dying (which is painted on the scalp), some suggest to avoid it altogether. We reported the questionable ingredients in sunscreen earlier this year, so it’s not a surprise that this is controversial for pregnant women. To be on the safe side, buy products that are “noncomedogenic” or “nonacnegenic,” or even opt for mineral makeup. For acne-prone skin, stick to products that contain Glycolic acid or just AHA. more...



Skincare safe products during pregnancy - Skinfo's

Skincare safe products during pregnancy. Luckily, most of these conditions are resolved shortly after delivery; however, there are steps you can take to treat your skin issues while pregnant, as long as you use pregnancy safe skincare products. Here’s an overview of what issues you may experience and how you can safely treat your skin issues while pregnant: Stretch marks: Stretch marks a reddish-purple lines on the abdomen, breasts, and thighs that are caused by the pulling and stretching that skin undergoes during pregnancy. Acne : The pregnancy “glow” that everyone talks about comes from increased oil production in the skin of pregnant women, and unfortunately, this oil can also cause acne , especially around the mouth. You can also use over-the-counter acne products, like astringents, but take special care to avoid products containing benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, or retinoids, which are unsafe for pregnant women to use. Puffiness in the eyelids and face: During the third trimester, pregnant women experience increased blood circulation, which can cause the face and eyelids to puff up. Retinoids and salicylic acid have been shown to cause birth defects and pregnancy complications, and doctors recommend that pregnant women avoid the use of such products. more...



Pregnancy Skin Care : Get That Glow

Pregnancy Skin Care: Get That Glow! Indeed, while pregnancy can leave some lucky ladies looking luscious, for others, all that extra hormonal activity can have the opposite effect, causing a variety of pregnancy skin problems . 1 skin problem to hit women during pregnancy - but there are also a variety of bumps and rashes and discolorations that occur as well, most of them due to hormone activity," says Ellen Marmur, MD, chief of dermatologic and cosmetic surgery at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. Moreover, you might also find that at least some of the tried and true beauty products you relied on to keep your skin glowing before pregnancy are unsafe to use after baby is on board. "These are the most common areas for acne to occur during pregnancy, and if you don't treat it right away, it will continue until you deliver, and sometimes even after baby is born," says Marmur. They are not safe to use during pregnancy," says Jamal, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology and microbiology at NYU Medical Center in New York City. more...



Makeup, Skin Care and Pregnancy

Makeup, Skin Care and Pregnancy. It’s not a surprise that pregnancy changes a lot about your body, but many women simply don’t think about how their skincare and makeup routines may change in pregnancy. Since the hormones that affect the body also change the complexion, you should consider reviving your makeup as you progress through pregnancy. Keep Your Makeup in Pregnancy Routine Simple. If you find that the glow of pregnancy is only radiating blotchy skin, or chloasma  (the mask of pregnancy), you can alter that somewhat with makeup. Also find something that works well with your skin tone to avoid having your face a different color than your body. If you’re experiencing acne or oily skin from pregnancy, you may want to switch tactics when it comes to makeup. You may find that your tried and true essentials simply aren’t cutting it because of the changes in your skin in pregnancy. Also be sure to remove any makeup that you wear - sleeping in makeup is a great way to promote acne or other complications of your skin. If you find that your skin is dry , even on your face, consider a nice moisturizer. Your skin may be more sensitive during pregnancy. You should also watch out for certain chemicals in makeup because your skin absorbs chemicals from everything. more...



Pregnancy and Breastfeeding : What Skin Care Products Can I

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding: What Products Can I Use While Pregnant or Nursing. If you’re concerned about what skin care products you can use during pregnancy and nursing, read on. Above all else, while pregnant or nursing, we recommend that you consult with your OB-GYN about any product (VMV Hypoallergenics or not) that you are considering using. We normally suggest — for at least until the 3rd trimester, but ideally for the entire pregnancy — that you discontinue skin care products with active ingredients that are not washed off quickly, such as: Other pregnancy skin care products that can be continued (with the guidance of your OB-GYN at all times, of course): On Skin Problem Prevention and Sunscreen Use While Pregnant. Your makeup , sunscreen , all other products should also be non-comedogenic and hypoallergenic (while allergens may not clog pores the way comedogens do, they can irritate pores and cause infections, i.e. With irritants or allergens you risk exacerbating the dryness and … While there are no conclusive clinical studies showing that active ingredients topically applied on the skin, especially at the concentrations found in our active skin care, can (positively or negatively) affect fetal development (much less the milk that gets to your baby), your OB-GYN (gynecologist) and pediatrician would be your best resources regarding the latest studies available. Some information that may help you and your OB-GYN: Historically, the active ingredients that have caused the most concern when taken internally are retinoic acid (found in our Superskin Toners) and salicylic acid (found in Id Toner and Lotion), not glycolic acid (found in Re-Everything and Illuminants+ products) which is a simple sugarcane-derived ingredient, or mandelic acid (found in our Superskin Primer Toners). However, the concentrations used in cosmetics are so small that it is still considered unlikely that enough of it can penetrate to cause any damage; still, retinoic acid is, by far, the active ingredient that causes the most red flags for pregnant women and it probably should be avoided altogether regardless of the concentration. This is NOT a recommendation to use active ingredients during your pregnancy — as you can see at the start of this article, we are firm about discouraging the use of active ingredients during pregnancy and nursing. The reason for this is simple precaution: because studies are inconclusive, we would rather play extra safe with pregnant and nursing moms and discourage the use of active ingredients that are not immediately washed off the skin during pregnancy and lactation. Data regarding the effects (positive or negative) of topical skin treatments on fetal or infant development at this point may be inconclusive; but for anything taken orally, you should be conscientious and always consult your doctor beforehand. more...



Pregnancy Friendly Skin Care Products - 15 Minute Beauty

Pregnancy Friendly Skin Care Products. To create that list of 8 maternity oriented skin care lines that are safe, I went through the ingredients in a ton of skin care lines to find the ones that fit my criteria for pregnancy safe skincare . There are also a lot of great products that are pregnancy friendly, but not necessarily from a full pregnancy skin care line. There are a lot of really great skin care lines in those big box stores, and many of their products are pregnancy friendly! more...



A List of Skin Care Ingredients That Shouldn't Be Used

Although a woman may not have reactions to ingredients in skin-care products prior to being pregnant, she needs to consider all the potentially harmful ingredients in the products during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Read the labels carefully to avoid skin-care ingredients that shouldn't be used while breastfeeding or when pregnant. Petroleum Products May Irritate Baby. A breastfeeding mother should avoid petroleum-based ingredients, because they can irritate sensitive baby skin. Formaldehyde can cause serious allergies and allergic reactions in the breastfeeding baby. Some technical names used to indicate the presence of formaldehyde include hydroxymethylglycinate, DMDM-hydantoin and methenesmine. more...



Safe Skin Care Products to Use While Pregnant

Melasma is a common skin condition during pregnancy. Chemical peels, which can even the skin tone, are generally not safe during pregnancy. Mild and gentle cleansers are best during pregnancy. Amy Newburger, a dermatologist in New York, told Discovery Health that glycerin-based facial cleansers are best during pregnancy because they are gentle and moisturizing. Discovery Health states that the most important skin care product for a pregnant woman is sunscreen. Sunscreen is recommended during pregnancy to reduce the appearances of blotches caused by melasma and also to prevent burning. The use of moisturizers is important during pregnancy, as pregnant women's skin tends to become dry easier than that of other women. more...



Products to avoid while pregnant

Safe alternative: Bath products designed for babies and young children are usually gentler on the skin, and do not contain harmful chemicals. Safe alternative: There's really no alternative to skin whitening during pregnancy, and it should be put off at least until you are no longer breastfeeding. Chemical hair removal: Hair removal products contain thioglycolic acid-its effects on pregnant women and their babies are unknown, so healthcare providers recommend that you avoid chemical hair removal products while you are pregnant. Plucking, shaving, and even waxing are all safe ways to remove unwanted hair during pregnancy. Safe alternative: Natural scents are preferable for pregnant women because they don't contain as many airborne, irritating chemicals as the stickier and stinkier products. Safe alternative: Gently washing your face with an oil-free wash on a daily basis can help treat and prevent acne, even when caused by pregnancy. Bug spray: Some bug spray contains the chemical (DEET), and its effects can lead to many pregnancy complications. Ethylene glycol can lead to a host of developmental problems for your baby, so make sure the paint you are using contains safe compounds. Safe alternative: Water-based paint thinners are a safe alternative and shouldn’t be as irritating. Safe alternative: Wearing loose clothing should help keep you comfortable, and Baby safe. Safe alternative: Pregnant women do not get their periods, but panty liners are safe to help deal with discharge. Herbal supplements: Unless explicitly directed by your healthcare provider, you should avoid herbal supplements during pregnancy, as their ingredients are not regulated by the FDA. Safe alternative: Your prenatal vitamin has all of the vitamins you and Baby need. more...



Insect Repellent Use and Safety - West Nile Virus

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use as repellents applied to skin and clothing. Regardless of what product you use, if you start to get mosquito bites, reapply the repellent according to the label instructions. EPA recommends the following when using insect repellents: Apply repellents only to exposed skin and/or clothing (as directed on the product label). When using repellent sprays, do not spray directly on your face—spray on your hands first and then apply to your face. When using on children, apply to your own hands first and then put it on the child. Products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not to be used on children under the age of three years. EPA does not recommend any additional precautions for repellent use by pregnant or nursing women. Can I use an insect repellent and a product containing sunscreen at the same time? People can, and should, use both a sunscreen and an insect repellent when they are outdoors. Should I use combination sunscreen/insect repellent products? It is not recommended to use a single product that combines insect repellent containing DEET and sunscreen. Always follow the instructions on the label of whatever product you are using. more...



Skin Care Ingredients and Supplements Pregnant or Nursing

Skin Care Ingredients and Supplements Pregnant or Nursing Women Should Not Use. However, I was a bit alarmed by the dearth of information available to pregnant and nursing women online with regards to their skin care products and supplements. I found that one or more licensed dermatologists and experts have recommended that women stop using or doing the following while pregnant or nursing: Hess concluded that the form of retinoids commonly used in cosmetic products should be safe for use during pregnancy and while nursing. Another reason is that retinol and retinyl palmitate have about one-twentieth the potency of tretinoin ( Lupo ). Therefore, based on the literature, it seems that topical treatments with retinol and retinyl palmitate should be safe. Further, one 1999 study of about 300 women did not find a link between consumption of about 50000 IU/day vitamin A and birth defects , but the current scientific literature overall seems to recommend about 8,000 IU/day during pregnancy, and ideally no more than 10,000 IU/day. If you are confused about your vitamin A intake, write down the foods and supplements you consume during a typical week, and ask your doctor or nutritionist. Therefore, when pregnant or nursing, try to spend more sunscreen-free time in the sun, and take a vitamin D supplement, but keep total vitamin D from food and supplements below 50 micrograms, or 2000 IU . However, avobenzone and oxybenzone (the latter present in 20-30% of sunscreens) have been demonstrated by Hayden et. For this reason, sunscreens containing this agent are not recommended for use in children.” And, again, although maximal absorption of a topical ingredient from the skin is about 33% , it is probably a safe approach to use sunscreens without avobenzone or oxybenzone during pregnancy or while nursing. According to Baby Center.com , soy -containing products and oil of bergamot have estrogenic effects, which can make this form of melasma (darkening of the skin) worse. Based on the scientific research available, while pregnant or nursing, it is vital to alter your skin care regime so that it does not include Accutane, to avoid taking supplements containing salicyclic acid or BHA , and to get at least fifteen minutes of sunscreen-free sun exposure at peak times of the day (10 A. To be on the safe side, stop use of Retin-A one month before trying to become pregnant, stop using peels and acne treatments containing salicyclic acid, and be cautious about vitamin A supplements while pregnant or nursing. To be extremely cautious while pregnant or nursing, stop using skin care products containing retinol or retinyl palmitate and stop using sunscreens containing oxybenzone or avobenzone . more...



Are Skin Lightening Products Safe To Use During Pregnancy

Q: I am 6 months pregnant and my husband gifted me one of the best skin brightener. The most active ingredients of skin brighteners are glutathione, potent steroids and hydroquinone. In spite of the potential threat, pharmaceutical and cosmetic companies remain active in their marketing of skin lightening products towards pregnant women to address melasma. Darkening of the skin is caused by a shift of hormones, and melanin deposits appear on the face. Although there is a very small rate of pregnant women who do not get any skin discolorations at all, melasma and linea nigra are normal and expected during pregnancy. Skin lightening products are widely campaigned all over the world as a solution to skin darkening problems. This is seen futile in pregnant women because in most cases skin discoloration eventually fades after pregnancy, and sometimes the lightened regions appear lighter than the rest of the skin. Common side effects of skin lightening products are skin irritation, further skin discoloration , edema, and crust formation on the skin. However, dermatologists advise against breastfeeding mothers and pregnant women using skin lightening products without consulting their pediatrician or first. Hormonal changes are inevitable, and the risks associated with skin brighteners outweigh the advantages. Wanting a fairer, more even skin tone is a choice of beauty, but during pregnancy your priority is the health and wellness of yourself and your unborn child. Even doctors strongly advise applying skin lightening creams during pregnancy and breastfeeding, so just resist the urge and wait until after giving birth before considering the idea. Unless you are 101% sure that the cream you are about to use is medically proven and tested safe, stay away from using skin lightening potions and creams. more...



Retinol : When to Use It, and When to Avoid It Healthy Skin

You may have noticed that retinol has made its way into an increasing number of skin care products. Retinol is a weaker, over the counter version of tretinoin, a prescription vitamin A derivative that is highly effective in reversing sun damage and signs of aging. Retinol is milder; while the results may not be as dramatic, more people tolerate it well. Like tretinoin, retinol encourages skin cell turnover; this new skin is delicate and should not be exposed to the sun. Vitamin A derivatives, including retinol, rapidly break down when exposed to the sun and air. What worries me and many other dermatologists is that retinol is now in used in foundations, lipsticks, sunscreens and cleansers, especially those that are touted as “anti-aging.” But in daytime products, retinol will have the opposite effect and actually make skin age faster because it is more susceptible to the sun, no matter the amount of SPF protection promised on the foundation or sunscreen. Retinol-containing cleansers are simply a waste of money, because the retinol is washed down the drain and is not on the skin long enough to work. That includes all skin care products, even serums and night creams. The bottom line is that retinol is a useful and proven ingredient in its proper place – night time products. The opinions expressed in Web MD Second Opinion are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of Web MD Second Opinion are not reviewed by a Web MD physician or any member of the Web MD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U. more...



Facial Cleansers

Posts: 926. I was reading that there are several chemicals in facial cleansers and moisturizers that are not good to use while pregnant. Posts: 217. Posts: 259. Posts: 3,208. I use Lush products, but now I have a doubt, I have to check it's safe. Posts: 8,612. Posts: 633. Posts: 870. Momtastic.com and they have not been reviewed by a physician, psychologist or parenting expert or any member of the Babyand Bump. more...



Safe skin care during pregnancy - BabyCenter Canada

The vast majority of these lotions and products are safe to use since they have low absorption rates. Avoid the use of oral retinoids during pregnancy. Whether salicylic acid is safe during pregnancy depends somewhat on how you use it, the p H balance, the strength, and the quantity you use (Bozzo, Chua-Gocheco, Einarson 2011). Use some caution and consult your midwife, doctor or a dermatologist to determine if the way you are using your product containing salicylic acid and the chemical makeup of it are safe for pregnancy. While soy-based lotions and facial products are generally safe to use, but may make common pregnancy skin changes like the mask of pregnancy (dark splotches on facial skin) worse. And as your mom always told you: Don't forget the sunscreen. Sunscreens, including those with ingredients that penetrate the skin, are considered safe. You can use titanium dioxide or zinc oxide as they are good sunscreens and do not penetrate your skin. These are safe and will not affect the health of your baby. These products use ingredients that primarily sit on top of the skin and don't cause irritation for most people. more...



8 Beauty No - Nos When You're Preg - O - Total Beauty and Barber

I have been so overwhelmed with what I should and should not use during pregnancy. By cheryl_arguin Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 06:57 PM Report as inappropriate. Am I the only one who really, really hates it when people say "Preg-O"? By Little Bunny Thursday, January 10, 2013 at 10:01 AM Report as inappropriate. By Erica F 123 Saturday, December 29, 2012 at 11:55 AM Report as inappropriate. By cheerio9551 Thursday, December 20, 2012 at 10:08 PM Report as inappropriate. By nicky22 Saturday, December 1, 2012 at 08:37 PM Report as inappropriate. By Lamexicana1 Saturday, December 1, 2012 at 04:58 PM Report as inappropriate. By Nin Saturday, September 1, 2012 at 11:00 PM Report as inappropriate. By charlize_adrienne Tuesday, April 17, 2012 at 06:32 PM Report as inappropriate. By beautybody Thursday, March 29, 2012 at 12:13 PM Report as inappropriate. I'm sure some products are better than others to use, but are people using that much of a certain product that it could be absorbed by the body that fast? more...



Is It Safe to Use Acne Medication During Pregnancy

Only if you use the right kinds. Web MD the Magazine Now Available Online. Preview the magazine and register to get your FREE subscription. Accutane (generically called isotretinoin ), which can cause birth defects , as well as increase the risk of miscarriage and infant death; Topical retinoids ( adapalene , tazarotene, and tretinoin ), which pass into the bloodstream and so on to the fetus ; and. If you want to use over-the-counter acne products, be sure to talk to your doctor first. But products containing salicylic acids are not, as they can lead to birth defects. Doctors also recommend not using products with alpha-hydroxy acids, as they are absorbed into the bloodstream and the effects on fetuses are unknown. more...



How to Treat Acne During Pregnancy : 14 Steps

But it is a nuisance, and many common acne treatments may not be safe during pregnancy. Don't use two or more products with the same active ingredients. Do not take oral acne treatments during pregnancy unless directed by a doctor. Clindamycin and erythromycin, two of the most common options, are both in pregnancy category B. They are considered safe to use during pregnancy. If you do find an over-the-counter drug, confirm the other active ingredients are safe as well. [14] [15] Your doctor can help you judge the risk and choose a low-dosage product. The physical irritation of your skin causes the breakout, not bacteria from your fingers. Because skin is particularly susceptible during pregnancy, cosmetic products that did not bother you before can cause acne now. You may want to talk to your doctor about safe cosmetic use during pregnancy. A healthy diet for you and your baby is much more important than an "acne diet" that might not even work. Both of these chemicals dry the skin, which can cause the body to overcompensate with more oil. This leads to dryness, which will cause your skin to overcompensate in its production of oil in the affected area. more...



Safe skin care during pregnancy

Most pregnant women know that what they put (or don't put) in their bodies is important to the well-being of their growing baby, whether it's the right kind of protein, too much caffeine, or certain types of fish. Most of us slather on oceans of lotions every day, but we don't think about what might be passing the skin barrier and being absorbed into our bodies. The more powerful and targeted products get, the more we need to be careful about what we have in our skin-care regimens during pregnancy. more...



What Cosmetic Products Should Pregnant Women Avoid

According to Baby Zone, some women do not realize that products applied to the skin, such as face creams, are absorbed and can affect the developing baby as well. Baby Zone states that many anti-aging products contain retinoids, a chemical that can be dangerous to a developing baby, and should be avoided. Pregnancy.org notes that during the first trimester, acne can be a problem for some women due to the hormonal changes of the body. Using sunscreen during pregnancy is safe and recommended over excessive sun exposure or sun burn, explains Baby Zone. Baby Center states that titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are especially safe as they do not absorb into the skin. According to Baby Center, pregnant women should choose makeup that is "noncomedogenic" or "nonacnegenic," which means they are oil-free and won't clog pores. According to Baby Center, the only risk with regard to hair removal products is the possibility of an allergy. Many women become extra sensitive to products on the skin during pregnancy and the risk of an allergic reaction to chemicals is increased. There are no specific chemicals found in hair removal products that cause problems during pregnancy or to the developing baby. more...



Best Face Forward : Safe Beauty Products for Pregnancy and

Best Face Forward: Safe Beauty Products for Pregnancy and Nursing. And while some products are not safe to use in pregnancy, the good news is there are plenty of alternatives and plenty of products that are safe to use. These lotions and sprays stay mostly on the surface of the skin with only minimal absorption, which makes them safe for you to use during pregnancy or while you are breastfeeding. Acne, a common complaint for many expecting women, is an unfortunate and common side effect of the hormonal changes that accompany pregnancy. Steer clear of products that cover more surface area or sit on the skin for longer time periods—they are more likely to be absorbed into your skin. Leslie Baumann, Ph D, the author of The Skin Type Solution and a professor of dermatology at the University of Miami, says a facial cleanser for acne that has two percent or less salicylic acid is safe for use. Most experts agree that pregnant and nursing women should avoid products containing retinoids. When used according to the instructions on the package, hair removes and depilatories (such as Nair or Neet) are safe for women to use during pregnancy and breastfeeding—a relief to many women, since shaving during pregnancy can be especially difficult. As with anything that is applied to the skin, especially in large doses, DEET can be absorbed through your skin and enter the bloodstream. Products containing soy are generally safe to use, but “Soy can make the ‘mask of pregnancy’ (dark splotches on facial skin) worse, as can oil of bergamot, which is in many organic products,” says Dr. more...



Treating Acne During Pregnancy

Now that you're pregnant, you may notice a sudden flare-up of acne breakouts, even if your skin has been relatively clear for years. Maybe pregnancy is causing you to developing acne for the first time - ever. Whether or not you decide to treat acne during your pregnancy depends on your skin, your situation, and your obstetrician's advice. Talk with Your OB and Dermatologist Before Starting Any Treatment. Before starting any acne treatment, even over-the-counter acne products , talk to your obstetrician. Mild acne may not need any special treatment at all, and your doctor might suggest waiting until the baby is born before starting a treatment. If your acne is worsening, if you have been battling breakouts since before your pregnancy, or your acne is severe , you may feel the need for an acne treatment medication. Your obstetrician and dermatologist must be part of your acne treatment team during this time, because they can guide you to the safest, best acne treatments for you. While the treatments below are considered safe to use during pregnancy, you should talk to your doctor before using any acne medications. But it's one of the most widely recommended acne treatment medications and most physicians consider it safe to use during pregnancy. You and your doctor will have to weigh the pros and cons of this medication and decide if it's right for your situation. It's not the most effective acne treatment, though, and is most often prescribed along with another acne treatment. Many acne treatment medications can harm a developing fetus and must be avoided during pregnancy. Let your dermatologist know you are pregnant before being treated for acne. Always talk to your doctor before using any acne treatment medication while pregnant or breastfeeding. more...



10 Best Beauty Products for Pregnant Women

Wish I had seen this when I was pregnant. By lilas Wednesday, October 3, 2012 at 10:16 AM Report as inappropriate. By sweettpea29 Tuesday, June 19, 2012 at 05:46 PM Report as inappropriate. By rachaellh13 Tuesday, June 19, 2012 at 05:14 PM Report as inappropriate. By VV 001 Sunday, June 17, 2012 at 08:47 PM Report as inappropriate. By kez_shay Tuesday, May 22, 2012 at 02:18 PM Report as inappropriate. By luxylexi Monday, May 14, 2012 at 04:31 PM Report as inappropriate. By lisiana_de_bem_justino Saturday, April 28, 2012 at 06:20 PM Report as inappropriate. By beautybody Wednesday, April 4, 2012 at 11:13 PM Report as inappropriate. By kez_shay Tuesday, January 31, 2012 at 09:04 AM Report as inappropriate. more...



10 Best Pregnancy Acne Products

The product contains tea tree oil which is a powerful anti-microbial, anti-acne and antioxidant. The cinnamon in the product contains antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Priced at INR 175 for 120 g. The product absorbs excess oil and other impurities that can cause acne. Priced at INR 199 for 75 g. Priced at INR 155 for 70 g. It works as an ideal base for makeup and leaves the skin fresh and pure. Priced at INR 1495 for 30 ml. These are acne products safe for pregnancy and for topical use. more...